Latest recipes

People Lose a Lot of Phones in Coffee Shops

People Lose a Lot of Phones in Coffee Shops


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

And you thought they'd lose them in bars, didn't you?

In the post-St. Patrick's Day haze, we're fairly certain plenty of New York City bars were getting calls about lost phones.

So imagine our surprise that a study from Lookout says that most people lose their phone in coffee shops, not at crazy dive bars in the early morning.

Lookout, an iPhone and Android locator, found 9 million lost phones in 2011, they say. Of those found, most of them were found in coffee shops, followed by bars, the office, and restaurants.

Apartments and condos, grocery stores, gas stations, homes, pharmacies or drugstores, and parks rounded out the top 10 places to lose your phone.

Lookout also found that Phildelphians lose the most phones, whereas cellphone users in New York City and San Francisco lose phones three times as often as those in Chicago. So coffee shops in Philadelphia must find a lot of iPhones. To be fair, plenty of people don't function until they get their morning caffeine fix.


Phones, coffee, life

Errol Grossman was born in Elk city and was raised on a ranch northwest of Elk City.

As a young child, she would often spend the night with her grandparents who lived 2 miles from her home. She said she remembers calling her grandma on what her parents called the “whoop and hollar” phone, which was actually a telephone in a big, wooden box with a crank on one side and an earpiece which resembled a small megaphone.

The crank was used to “ring” the people you wanted to talk to. Errol said she remembers her parents’ ring was two long rings and one short ring, while her grandma’s ring was one long, one short and one long.

One day, Errol called her grandma and some woman had the nerve to say “operator” in her ear. Errol said, “I want my grandma,” and her grandmother answered shortly.

After that style telephone discontinued, her family got a rotary desk telephone and were assigned their own telephone number — Capital 1-2248 — and the people in the community were placed on a “party line.” This meant any of the neighbors on that line could listen in on any of the other people’s conversations.

Errol said her mother often ended her conversation with her aunt with, “Goodbye, Jewel (the aunt). Goodbye, Alice (the neighbor).” Errol said there weren’t many secrets in her neighborhood.

As a child, Errol said she remembers the delicious smell of coffee brewing while her mother was making breakfast for her dad. She couldn’t wait until she was 16 “so I could have a cup.”

“Boy was I surprised,” Errol said. “It was the worst thing I had ever tasted.”

She said her Dad always rose before the children, ate breakfast and went to work. He had a bulldozer business and would do work for various people across the country. Once he left, Errol’s mother would let the children sleep in, at least in the summer time. Once they had awakened for the day and had breakfast, Errol’s mother would take the children to the large garden. Each of the seven children — Errol was the middle child — helped, no matter their age.

“To this day, I love gardening and plant a large one every year, even though my children are grown and no longer live with us,” Errol said. “Sometimes it does well and sometimes not, but I almost can guarantee the okra will produce.”

When Errol’s children were young, they would help her gather the vegetables — usually squash, green beans, okra and tomatoes — and her sons would sell them at the farmer’s market, which was located at the intersection of Franklin and Broadway in Weatherford.

The sale of vegetables provided them with extra spending money during the summer months and helped Errol “keep up” with the vegetables. She also did a lot of canning and froze a lot of okra to enjoy in the winter months.

Once the outside temperature got hot, the family would return to the house to clean it and complete chores. The home had no air conditioner, so they kept the windows open at all times in the summer — unless it rained.

Errol’s chore was cleaning the bathroom. She said she didn’t like it much, but it had to be done. The family did chores until lunch, which consisted of a home-cooked meal, usually beef. Errol’s dad raised cattle and would occasionally have an animal butchered to provide food for his family.

Sometimes it would be fried chicken, which would be “harvested” from their yard to cook and enjoy. Errol’s family raised chickens and always had plenty of fresh eggs for breakfast, for ice cream or to sell if there were extra.

Dinner was usually something simple for Errol and her siblings. Her dad would get a get a good meal when her returned home, usually after the kids were fed and in bed for the night. Even though the days were long, Errol’s dad still would find time to spend with his children — usually on the weekends.

Since Errol was raised in the country, more often than not, the home did not have television reception, so Errol and her siblings would spend many hours playing outside in the creeks and countryside. Errol said there was a place which had washed out along the bank of a field beside the road near their house. She said it had so many different colors of sand they called it their “sand store” and played there for hours on end.

Errol said they also had several ponds on her dad’s land, had names which are still used to this day. Errol and her siblings had a favorite pond where they would swim almost daily during the summer, often making a freezer of homemade ice cream to enjoy when they returned to the house — usually vanilla with homemade chocolate syrup.

Errol was raised in a one and a half story house, and when she was in her pre-teens, her father bought another house and moved it beside the first one. He connected the two, adding much-needed room for the family. Errol and her siblings finally got to have a bedroom which didn’t have four or five other people sleeping in the same room.

Errol went to school at Merritt, graduating in a class of 13.

“I dated very few of my classmates, as some of them started first grade together — we didn’t have kindergarten — and continued to go through school for the next 12 years together,” Errol said. “We knew each other so well dating almost would have been like dating my brothers.”

Errol’s graduating class had eight boys and five girls. Occasionally, the class would lose some of their classmates due to families moving away. Some years they would gain one or two as more families moved into the community She said it was always a pleasure to welcome new friends.

“All of the classmates I graduated with are still alive,” Errol said. “I see some of them frequently. It’s always a good time to catch up on what’s going on with all of them.”

After graduating high school, Errol continued her education at SWOSU. Her class was the first to graduate after Southwestern Oklahoma State was declared a university. She married her husband Kim between her junior and senior years in college. This year they celebrated their 46th anniversary.

After graduating from SWOSU, Errol started working for Ken and Phyllis Reid at the Weatherford Daily News and met current Publisher Phillip Reid, who still was in high school at the time.

“We formed a close friendship, which we still have to this day,” Errol said. “I remember when I was pregnant with my daughter and went to tell Ken. He asked ‘Why did Phillip already know?’”

Errol left the WDN after the birth of her first child Autumn and worked as a mother and homemaker for 18 months. Then her second child, Jeremiah, was born. When Jeremiah was 7 months old, Errol began working at the Weatherford Post Office as a part-time flex clerk-carrier — a position which no longer exists. After 5 years at the post office, she gave birth to her third child, Zachary.

While Errol’s children were growing up, they all played soccer, She said in their younger years, they played recreational soccer, which meant practice during the week and games in neighboring towns Saturday.

“I remember one Saturday, during my 2-hour lunch break, I drove to Elk City to watch my two older children play,” Errol said. “I was lucky enough to have them playing on adjacent fields, so I would take turns watching the different fields. I got to watch a total of 30 minutes before heading back to finish my shift, but during that time, I got to see my son score a goal. It’s crazy what we do for our children, isn’t it?”

Her husband Kim started coaching soccer when Zach, their youngest, started playing in the 6 and younger group. She said there was a shortage of coaches and referees, so Kim did both. Errol said she assisted him and eventually became a referee, which led to “lots of running up and down the field.”

“I couldn’t do that today if I tried,” Errol said.

As Errol’s children grew older, the trio played high school soccer until they graduated. Errol said Kim and she were very involved in the high school soccer program, with Kim being the president for 2 years. Errol was the secretary for several years. She also was the concessions stand coordinator for some time.

“I still enjoy watching soccer games — from the younger players through the professional games we watch on television,” Errol said.

Errol continued to work at the post office for 32 years, often reporting to work as early as 3:30 a.m. to sort mail for the carriers to deliver and the clerks to box. Once the boxes were filled, Errol said she would take a lunch and return to work the window until her shift was up. She said she still wakes up early — usually between 5-6 a.m., which Errol doesn’t mind because she “likes to watch the world wake up.”

While Errol worked at the post office, it was not unusual to work up to 12 hours a day as well as 8 hours Saturday and a few hours on Sunday.

During the 1980s oil boom, the population of Weatherford grew immensely. Errol said the mail was never completely sorted through the day, and the sorters had to determine which mail would have to take precedence. After everything settled, all the mail got sorted and work hours shrunk to 4-8 hours.

Errol also was required to carry mail out to customer’s homes or businesses at times if the office was short on carriers.

“I remember when the city received a snow almost knee deep,” Errol said. “Every able-bodied employee helped deliver the mail. I took my own vehicle — a Ford Bronco — to the street to carry the required amount of mail I needed to deliver. Every time I would start out with the heavy pouch on my shoulder, I would think, “This has to be the last loop. I am just getting too tired.”’

However, Errol would return to her vehicle with an empty bag, refill it and begin another loop until all the mail was delivered. One of her final deliveries was to a couple of elderly ladies who had a mail receptacle too small for their mail.

“I knocked on their door, and when one of them answered, the most wonderful smell greeted me,” Errol said. “I mentioned how delicious the smell was, and she told me they had been baking bread all day. She fetched a loaf and said, ‘Here, take one with you.’ It was like a reward for sticking out the day.”

Errol continued to work for the Weatherford Post Office until she retired in 2012. She said she misses her customers very much.

“When I go about town and see one of them, we always have a nice visit,” she said. “There are several who, when I see them, I know we will have a great laugh while we are visiting — and I am never disappointed.”

Kim also retired about the same time. Since the couple had begun to raise cattle on a part-time basis years before, they decided to keep themselves busy with the business.

“Boy, were we busy and still are,” Errol said.

She said they both love working with cattle, especially watching the calves frolicking about. However, the cattle business is not an easy one. Errol said they never know what they will find when they feed and check on the cattle or what the cattle will sell for.

Errol said Kim decided the family needed to begin trout fishing during the early months of the year.

“We have great luck with that, often catching our limit when we go, which was often 1-2 days a week,” Errol said. “Sometimes, we will meet our son and granddaughter, rent a cabin and make weekend of it.”

Errol said she once caught a rare fish for dinner.

“I was reeling in a fish and it flashed gold,” she said. “It turned out to be a golden rainbow trout, which aren’t very plentiful. It was so beautiful I wanted to release it. However, the trout die during the summer months due to the temperature being too warm for them to live, so I took it home and had it for dinner.”

Errol said she still loves getting out and seeing her friends in Weatherford.

“I have a very special friend in my neighbor Carol,” Errol said. “She will come to my house, and we will sit on the front porch and visit — sometimes about serious situations, sometimes just to have some laughs.”

One particular laugh was caused by a snake which slithered in front of the pair during one of their porch sessions.

“Imagine the excitement we had as we took some pictures to send to our children,” Errol said. “I laughed as I told Carol I was sending it to my younger son. It would make his hair stand on end. When we asked him about it later, he said it did make his hand stand up and his wife thought it was hilarious.”

While reflecting on her life, Errol said she enjoys being retired but would not trade any experiences or memories for anything.


Phones, coffee, life

Errol Grossman was born in Elk city and was raised on a ranch northwest of Elk City.

As a young child, she would often spend the night with her grandparents who lived 2 miles from her home. She said she remembers calling her grandma on what her parents called the “whoop and hollar” phone, which was actually a telephone in a big, wooden box with a crank on one side and an earpiece which resembled a small megaphone.

The crank was used to “ring” the people you wanted to talk to. Errol said she remembers her parents’ ring was two long rings and one short ring, while her grandma’s ring was one long, one short and one long.

One day, Errol called her grandma and some woman had the nerve to say “operator” in her ear. Errol said, “I want my grandma,” and her grandmother answered shortly.

After that style telephone discontinued, her family got a rotary desk telephone and were assigned their own telephone number — Capital 1-2248 — and the people in the community were placed on a “party line.” This meant any of the neighbors on that line could listen in on any of the other people’s conversations.

Errol said her mother often ended her conversation with her aunt with, “Goodbye, Jewel (the aunt). Goodbye, Alice (the neighbor).” Errol said there weren’t many secrets in her neighborhood.

As a child, Errol said she remembers the delicious smell of coffee brewing while her mother was making breakfast for her dad. She couldn’t wait until she was 16 “so I could have a cup.”

“Boy was I surprised,” Errol said. “It was the worst thing I had ever tasted.”

She said her Dad always rose before the children, ate breakfast and went to work. He had a bulldozer business and would do work for various people across the country. Once he left, Errol’s mother would let the children sleep in, at least in the summer time. Once they had awakened for the day and had breakfast, Errol’s mother would take the children to the large garden. Each of the seven children — Errol was the middle child — helped, no matter their age.

“To this day, I love gardening and plant a large one every year, even though my children are grown and no longer live with us,” Errol said. “Sometimes it does well and sometimes not, but I almost can guarantee the okra will produce.”

When Errol’s children were young, they would help her gather the vegetables — usually squash, green beans, okra and tomatoes — and her sons would sell them at the farmer’s market, which was located at the intersection of Franklin and Broadway in Weatherford.

The sale of vegetables provided them with extra spending money during the summer months and helped Errol “keep up” with the vegetables. She also did a lot of canning and froze a lot of okra to enjoy in the winter months.

Once the outside temperature got hot, the family would return to the house to clean it and complete chores. The home had no air conditioner, so they kept the windows open at all times in the summer — unless it rained.

Errol’s chore was cleaning the bathroom. She said she didn’t like it much, but it had to be done. The family did chores until lunch, which consisted of a home-cooked meal, usually beef. Errol’s dad raised cattle and would occasionally have an animal butchered to provide food for his family.

Sometimes it would be fried chicken, which would be “harvested” from their yard to cook and enjoy. Errol’s family raised chickens and always had plenty of fresh eggs for breakfast, for ice cream or to sell if there were extra.

Dinner was usually something simple for Errol and her siblings. Her dad would get a get a good meal when her returned home, usually after the kids were fed and in bed for the night. Even though the days were long, Errol’s dad still would find time to spend with his children — usually on the weekends.

Since Errol was raised in the country, more often than not, the home did not have television reception, so Errol and her siblings would spend many hours playing outside in the creeks and countryside. Errol said there was a place which had washed out along the bank of a field beside the road near their house. She said it had so many different colors of sand they called it their “sand store” and played there for hours on end.

Errol said they also had several ponds on her dad’s land, had names which are still used to this day. Errol and her siblings had a favorite pond where they would swim almost daily during the summer, often making a freezer of homemade ice cream to enjoy when they returned to the house — usually vanilla with homemade chocolate syrup.

Errol was raised in a one and a half story house, and when she was in her pre-teens, her father bought another house and moved it beside the first one. He connected the two, adding much-needed room for the family. Errol and her siblings finally got to have a bedroom which didn’t have four or five other people sleeping in the same room.

Errol went to school at Merritt, graduating in a class of 13.

“I dated very few of my classmates, as some of them started first grade together — we didn’t have kindergarten — and continued to go through school for the next 12 years together,” Errol said. “We knew each other so well dating almost would have been like dating my brothers.”

Errol’s graduating class had eight boys and five girls. Occasionally, the class would lose some of their classmates due to families moving away. Some years they would gain one or two as more families moved into the community She said it was always a pleasure to welcome new friends.

“All of the classmates I graduated with are still alive,” Errol said. “I see some of them frequently. It’s always a good time to catch up on what’s going on with all of them.”

After graduating high school, Errol continued her education at SWOSU. Her class was the first to graduate after Southwestern Oklahoma State was declared a university. She married her husband Kim between her junior and senior years in college. This year they celebrated their 46th anniversary.

After graduating from SWOSU, Errol started working for Ken and Phyllis Reid at the Weatherford Daily News and met current Publisher Phillip Reid, who still was in high school at the time.

“We formed a close friendship, which we still have to this day,” Errol said. “I remember when I was pregnant with my daughter and went to tell Ken. He asked ‘Why did Phillip already know?’”

Errol left the WDN after the birth of her first child Autumn and worked as a mother and homemaker for 18 months. Then her second child, Jeremiah, was born. When Jeremiah was 7 months old, Errol began working at the Weatherford Post Office as a part-time flex clerk-carrier — a position which no longer exists. After 5 years at the post office, she gave birth to her third child, Zachary.

While Errol’s children were growing up, they all played soccer, She said in their younger years, they played recreational soccer, which meant practice during the week and games in neighboring towns Saturday.

“I remember one Saturday, during my 2-hour lunch break, I drove to Elk City to watch my two older children play,” Errol said. “I was lucky enough to have them playing on adjacent fields, so I would take turns watching the different fields. I got to watch a total of 30 minutes before heading back to finish my shift, but during that time, I got to see my son score a goal. It’s crazy what we do for our children, isn’t it?”

Her husband Kim started coaching soccer when Zach, their youngest, started playing in the 6 and younger group. She said there was a shortage of coaches and referees, so Kim did both. Errol said she assisted him and eventually became a referee, which led to “lots of running up and down the field.”

“I couldn’t do that today if I tried,” Errol said.

As Errol’s children grew older, the trio played high school soccer until they graduated. Errol said Kim and she were very involved in the high school soccer program, with Kim being the president for 2 years. Errol was the secretary for several years. She also was the concessions stand coordinator for some time.

“I still enjoy watching soccer games — from the younger players through the professional games we watch on television,” Errol said.

Errol continued to work at the post office for 32 years, often reporting to work as early as 3:30 a.m. to sort mail for the carriers to deliver and the clerks to box. Once the boxes were filled, Errol said she would take a lunch and return to work the window until her shift was up. She said she still wakes up early — usually between 5-6 a.m., which Errol doesn’t mind because she “likes to watch the world wake up.”

While Errol worked at the post office, it was not unusual to work up to 12 hours a day as well as 8 hours Saturday and a few hours on Sunday.

During the 1980s oil boom, the population of Weatherford grew immensely. Errol said the mail was never completely sorted through the day, and the sorters had to determine which mail would have to take precedence. After everything settled, all the mail got sorted and work hours shrunk to 4-8 hours.

Errol also was required to carry mail out to customer’s homes or businesses at times if the office was short on carriers.

“I remember when the city received a snow almost knee deep,” Errol said. “Every able-bodied employee helped deliver the mail. I took my own vehicle — a Ford Bronco — to the street to carry the required amount of mail I needed to deliver. Every time I would start out with the heavy pouch on my shoulder, I would think, “This has to be the last loop. I am just getting too tired.”’

However, Errol would return to her vehicle with an empty bag, refill it and begin another loop until all the mail was delivered. One of her final deliveries was to a couple of elderly ladies who had a mail receptacle too small for their mail.

“I knocked on their door, and when one of them answered, the most wonderful smell greeted me,” Errol said. “I mentioned how delicious the smell was, and she told me they had been baking bread all day. She fetched a loaf and said, ‘Here, take one with you.’ It was like a reward for sticking out the day.”

Errol continued to work for the Weatherford Post Office until she retired in 2012. She said she misses her customers very much.

“When I go about town and see one of them, we always have a nice visit,” she said. “There are several who, when I see them, I know we will have a great laugh while we are visiting — and I am never disappointed.”

Kim also retired about the same time. Since the couple had begun to raise cattle on a part-time basis years before, they decided to keep themselves busy with the business.

“Boy, were we busy and still are,” Errol said.

She said they both love working with cattle, especially watching the calves frolicking about. However, the cattle business is not an easy one. Errol said they never know what they will find when they feed and check on the cattle or what the cattle will sell for.

Errol said Kim decided the family needed to begin trout fishing during the early months of the year.

“We have great luck with that, often catching our limit when we go, which was often 1-2 days a week,” Errol said. “Sometimes, we will meet our son and granddaughter, rent a cabin and make weekend of it.”

Errol said she once caught a rare fish for dinner.

“I was reeling in a fish and it flashed gold,” she said. “It turned out to be a golden rainbow trout, which aren’t very plentiful. It was so beautiful I wanted to release it. However, the trout die during the summer months due to the temperature being too warm for them to live, so I took it home and had it for dinner.”

Errol said she still loves getting out and seeing her friends in Weatherford.

“I have a very special friend in my neighbor Carol,” Errol said. “She will come to my house, and we will sit on the front porch and visit — sometimes about serious situations, sometimes just to have some laughs.”

One particular laugh was caused by a snake which slithered in front of the pair during one of their porch sessions.

“Imagine the excitement we had as we took some pictures to send to our children,” Errol said. “I laughed as I told Carol I was sending it to my younger son. It would make his hair stand on end. When we asked him about it later, he said it did make his hand stand up and his wife thought it was hilarious.”

While reflecting on her life, Errol said she enjoys being retired but would not trade any experiences or memories for anything.


Phones, coffee, life

Errol Grossman was born in Elk city and was raised on a ranch northwest of Elk City.

As a young child, she would often spend the night with her grandparents who lived 2 miles from her home. She said she remembers calling her grandma on what her parents called the “whoop and hollar” phone, which was actually a telephone in a big, wooden box with a crank on one side and an earpiece which resembled a small megaphone.

The crank was used to “ring” the people you wanted to talk to. Errol said she remembers her parents’ ring was two long rings and one short ring, while her grandma’s ring was one long, one short and one long.

One day, Errol called her grandma and some woman had the nerve to say “operator” in her ear. Errol said, “I want my grandma,” and her grandmother answered shortly.

After that style telephone discontinued, her family got a rotary desk telephone and were assigned their own telephone number — Capital 1-2248 — and the people in the community were placed on a “party line.” This meant any of the neighbors on that line could listen in on any of the other people’s conversations.

Errol said her mother often ended her conversation with her aunt with, “Goodbye, Jewel (the aunt). Goodbye, Alice (the neighbor).” Errol said there weren’t many secrets in her neighborhood.

As a child, Errol said she remembers the delicious smell of coffee brewing while her mother was making breakfast for her dad. She couldn’t wait until she was 16 “so I could have a cup.”

“Boy was I surprised,” Errol said. “It was the worst thing I had ever tasted.”

She said her Dad always rose before the children, ate breakfast and went to work. He had a bulldozer business and would do work for various people across the country. Once he left, Errol’s mother would let the children sleep in, at least in the summer time. Once they had awakened for the day and had breakfast, Errol’s mother would take the children to the large garden. Each of the seven children — Errol was the middle child — helped, no matter their age.

“To this day, I love gardening and plant a large one every year, even though my children are grown and no longer live with us,” Errol said. “Sometimes it does well and sometimes not, but I almost can guarantee the okra will produce.”

When Errol’s children were young, they would help her gather the vegetables — usually squash, green beans, okra and tomatoes — and her sons would sell them at the farmer’s market, which was located at the intersection of Franklin and Broadway in Weatherford.

The sale of vegetables provided them with extra spending money during the summer months and helped Errol “keep up” with the vegetables. She also did a lot of canning and froze a lot of okra to enjoy in the winter months.

Once the outside temperature got hot, the family would return to the house to clean it and complete chores. The home had no air conditioner, so they kept the windows open at all times in the summer — unless it rained.

Errol’s chore was cleaning the bathroom. She said she didn’t like it much, but it had to be done. The family did chores until lunch, which consisted of a home-cooked meal, usually beef. Errol’s dad raised cattle and would occasionally have an animal butchered to provide food for his family.

Sometimes it would be fried chicken, which would be “harvested” from their yard to cook and enjoy. Errol’s family raised chickens and always had plenty of fresh eggs for breakfast, for ice cream or to sell if there were extra.

Dinner was usually something simple for Errol and her siblings. Her dad would get a get a good meal when her returned home, usually after the kids were fed and in bed for the night. Even though the days were long, Errol’s dad still would find time to spend with his children — usually on the weekends.

Since Errol was raised in the country, more often than not, the home did not have television reception, so Errol and her siblings would spend many hours playing outside in the creeks and countryside. Errol said there was a place which had washed out along the bank of a field beside the road near their house. She said it had so many different colors of sand they called it their “sand store” and played there for hours on end.

Errol said they also had several ponds on her dad’s land, had names which are still used to this day. Errol and her siblings had a favorite pond where they would swim almost daily during the summer, often making a freezer of homemade ice cream to enjoy when they returned to the house — usually vanilla with homemade chocolate syrup.

Errol was raised in a one and a half story house, and when she was in her pre-teens, her father bought another house and moved it beside the first one. He connected the two, adding much-needed room for the family. Errol and her siblings finally got to have a bedroom which didn’t have four or five other people sleeping in the same room.

Errol went to school at Merritt, graduating in a class of 13.

“I dated very few of my classmates, as some of them started first grade together — we didn’t have kindergarten — and continued to go through school for the next 12 years together,” Errol said. “We knew each other so well dating almost would have been like dating my brothers.”

Errol’s graduating class had eight boys and five girls. Occasionally, the class would lose some of their classmates due to families moving away. Some years they would gain one or two as more families moved into the community She said it was always a pleasure to welcome new friends.

“All of the classmates I graduated with are still alive,” Errol said. “I see some of them frequently. It’s always a good time to catch up on what’s going on with all of them.”

After graduating high school, Errol continued her education at SWOSU. Her class was the first to graduate after Southwestern Oklahoma State was declared a university. She married her husband Kim between her junior and senior years in college. This year they celebrated their 46th anniversary.

After graduating from SWOSU, Errol started working for Ken and Phyllis Reid at the Weatherford Daily News and met current Publisher Phillip Reid, who still was in high school at the time.

“We formed a close friendship, which we still have to this day,” Errol said. “I remember when I was pregnant with my daughter and went to tell Ken. He asked ‘Why did Phillip already know?’”

Errol left the WDN after the birth of her first child Autumn and worked as a mother and homemaker for 18 months. Then her second child, Jeremiah, was born. When Jeremiah was 7 months old, Errol began working at the Weatherford Post Office as a part-time flex clerk-carrier — a position which no longer exists. After 5 years at the post office, she gave birth to her third child, Zachary.

While Errol’s children were growing up, they all played soccer, She said in their younger years, they played recreational soccer, which meant practice during the week and games in neighboring towns Saturday.

“I remember one Saturday, during my 2-hour lunch break, I drove to Elk City to watch my two older children play,” Errol said. “I was lucky enough to have them playing on adjacent fields, so I would take turns watching the different fields. I got to watch a total of 30 minutes before heading back to finish my shift, but during that time, I got to see my son score a goal. It’s crazy what we do for our children, isn’t it?”

Her husband Kim started coaching soccer when Zach, their youngest, started playing in the 6 and younger group. She said there was a shortage of coaches and referees, so Kim did both. Errol said she assisted him and eventually became a referee, which led to “lots of running up and down the field.”

“I couldn’t do that today if I tried,” Errol said.

As Errol’s children grew older, the trio played high school soccer until they graduated. Errol said Kim and she were very involved in the high school soccer program, with Kim being the president for 2 years. Errol was the secretary for several years. She also was the concessions stand coordinator for some time.

“I still enjoy watching soccer games — from the younger players through the professional games we watch on television,” Errol said.

Errol continued to work at the post office for 32 years, often reporting to work as early as 3:30 a.m. to sort mail for the carriers to deliver and the clerks to box. Once the boxes were filled, Errol said she would take a lunch and return to work the window until her shift was up. She said she still wakes up early — usually between 5-6 a.m., which Errol doesn’t mind because she “likes to watch the world wake up.”

While Errol worked at the post office, it was not unusual to work up to 12 hours a day as well as 8 hours Saturday and a few hours on Sunday.

During the 1980s oil boom, the population of Weatherford grew immensely. Errol said the mail was never completely sorted through the day, and the sorters had to determine which mail would have to take precedence. After everything settled, all the mail got sorted and work hours shrunk to 4-8 hours.

Errol also was required to carry mail out to customer’s homes or businesses at times if the office was short on carriers.

“I remember when the city received a snow almost knee deep,” Errol said. “Every able-bodied employee helped deliver the mail. I took my own vehicle — a Ford Bronco — to the street to carry the required amount of mail I needed to deliver. Every time I would start out with the heavy pouch on my shoulder, I would think, “This has to be the last loop. I am just getting too tired.”’

However, Errol would return to her vehicle with an empty bag, refill it and begin another loop until all the mail was delivered. One of her final deliveries was to a couple of elderly ladies who had a mail receptacle too small for their mail.

“I knocked on their door, and when one of them answered, the most wonderful smell greeted me,” Errol said. “I mentioned how delicious the smell was, and she told me they had been baking bread all day. She fetched a loaf and said, ‘Here, take one with you.’ It was like a reward for sticking out the day.”

Errol continued to work for the Weatherford Post Office until she retired in 2012. She said she misses her customers very much.

“When I go about town and see one of them, we always have a nice visit,” she said. “There are several who, when I see them, I know we will have a great laugh while we are visiting — and I am never disappointed.”

Kim also retired about the same time. Since the couple had begun to raise cattle on a part-time basis years before, they decided to keep themselves busy with the business.

“Boy, were we busy and still are,” Errol said.

She said they both love working with cattle, especially watching the calves frolicking about. However, the cattle business is not an easy one. Errol said they never know what they will find when they feed and check on the cattle or what the cattle will sell for.

Errol said Kim decided the family needed to begin trout fishing during the early months of the year.

“We have great luck with that, often catching our limit when we go, which was often 1-2 days a week,” Errol said. “Sometimes, we will meet our son and granddaughter, rent a cabin and make weekend of it.”

Errol said she once caught a rare fish for dinner.

“I was reeling in a fish and it flashed gold,” she said. “It turned out to be a golden rainbow trout, which aren’t very plentiful. It was so beautiful I wanted to release it. However, the trout die during the summer months due to the temperature being too warm for them to live, so I took it home and had it for dinner.”

Errol said she still loves getting out and seeing her friends in Weatherford.

“I have a very special friend in my neighbor Carol,” Errol said. “She will come to my house, and we will sit on the front porch and visit — sometimes about serious situations, sometimes just to have some laughs.”

One particular laugh was caused by a snake which slithered in front of the pair during one of their porch sessions.

“Imagine the excitement we had as we took some pictures to send to our children,” Errol said. “I laughed as I told Carol I was sending it to my younger son. It would make his hair stand on end. When we asked him about it later, he said it did make his hand stand up and his wife thought it was hilarious.”

While reflecting on her life, Errol said she enjoys being retired but would not trade any experiences or memories for anything.


Phones, coffee, life

Errol Grossman was born in Elk city and was raised on a ranch northwest of Elk City.

As a young child, she would often spend the night with her grandparents who lived 2 miles from her home. She said she remembers calling her grandma on what her parents called the “whoop and hollar” phone, which was actually a telephone in a big, wooden box with a crank on one side and an earpiece which resembled a small megaphone.

The crank was used to “ring” the people you wanted to talk to. Errol said she remembers her parents’ ring was two long rings and one short ring, while her grandma’s ring was one long, one short and one long.

One day, Errol called her grandma and some woman had the nerve to say “operator” in her ear. Errol said, “I want my grandma,” and her grandmother answered shortly.

After that style telephone discontinued, her family got a rotary desk telephone and were assigned their own telephone number — Capital 1-2248 — and the people in the community were placed on a “party line.” This meant any of the neighbors on that line could listen in on any of the other people’s conversations.

Errol said her mother often ended her conversation with her aunt with, “Goodbye, Jewel (the aunt). Goodbye, Alice (the neighbor).” Errol said there weren’t many secrets in her neighborhood.

As a child, Errol said she remembers the delicious smell of coffee brewing while her mother was making breakfast for her dad. She couldn’t wait until she was 16 “so I could have a cup.”

“Boy was I surprised,” Errol said. “It was the worst thing I had ever tasted.”

She said her Dad always rose before the children, ate breakfast and went to work. He had a bulldozer business and would do work for various people across the country. Once he left, Errol’s mother would let the children sleep in, at least in the summer time. Once they had awakened for the day and had breakfast, Errol’s mother would take the children to the large garden. Each of the seven children — Errol was the middle child — helped, no matter their age.

“To this day, I love gardening and plant a large one every year, even though my children are grown and no longer live with us,” Errol said. “Sometimes it does well and sometimes not, but I almost can guarantee the okra will produce.”

When Errol’s children were young, they would help her gather the vegetables — usually squash, green beans, okra and tomatoes — and her sons would sell them at the farmer’s market, which was located at the intersection of Franklin and Broadway in Weatherford.

The sale of vegetables provided them with extra spending money during the summer months and helped Errol “keep up” with the vegetables. She also did a lot of canning and froze a lot of okra to enjoy in the winter months.

Once the outside temperature got hot, the family would return to the house to clean it and complete chores. The home had no air conditioner, so they kept the windows open at all times in the summer — unless it rained.

Errol’s chore was cleaning the bathroom. She said she didn’t like it much, but it had to be done. The family did chores until lunch, which consisted of a home-cooked meal, usually beef. Errol’s dad raised cattle and would occasionally have an animal butchered to provide food for his family.

Sometimes it would be fried chicken, which would be “harvested” from their yard to cook and enjoy. Errol’s family raised chickens and always had plenty of fresh eggs for breakfast, for ice cream or to sell if there were extra.

Dinner was usually something simple for Errol and her siblings. Her dad would get a get a good meal when her returned home, usually after the kids were fed and in bed for the night. Even though the days were long, Errol’s dad still would find time to spend with his children — usually on the weekends.

Since Errol was raised in the country, more often than not, the home did not have television reception, so Errol and her siblings would spend many hours playing outside in the creeks and countryside. Errol said there was a place which had washed out along the bank of a field beside the road near their house. She said it had so many different colors of sand they called it their “sand store” and played there for hours on end.

Errol said they also had several ponds on her dad’s land, had names which are still used to this day. Errol and her siblings had a favorite pond where they would swim almost daily during the summer, often making a freezer of homemade ice cream to enjoy when they returned to the house — usually vanilla with homemade chocolate syrup.

Errol was raised in a one and a half story house, and when she was in her pre-teens, her father bought another house and moved it beside the first one. He connected the two, adding much-needed room for the family. Errol and her siblings finally got to have a bedroom which didn’t have four or five other people sleeping in the same room.

Errol went to school at Merritt, graduating in a class of 13.

“I dated very few of my classmates, as some of them started first grade together — we didn’t have kindergarten — and continued to go through school for the next 12 years together,” Errol said. “We knew each other so well dating almost would have been like dating my brothers.”

Errol’s graduating class had eight boys and five girls. Occasionally, the class would lose some of their classmates due to families moving away. Some years they would gain one or two as more families moved into the community She said it was always a pleasure to welcome new friends.

“All of the classmates I graduated with are still alive,” Errol said. “I see some of them frequently. It’s always a good time to catch up on what’s going on with all of them.”

After graduating high school, Errol continued her education at SWOSU. Her class was the first to graduate after Southwestern Oklahoma State was declared a university. She married her husband Kim between her junior and senior years in college. This year they celebrated their 46th anniversary.

After graduating from SWOSU, Errol started working for Ken and Phyllis Reid at the Weatherford Daily News and met current Publisher Phillip Reid, who still was in high school at the time.

“We formed a close friendship, which we still have to this day,” Errol said. “I remember when I was pregnant with my daughter and went to tell Ken. He asked ‘Why did Phillip already know?’”

Errol left the WDN after the birth of her first child Autumn and worked as a mother and homemaker for 18 months. Then her second child, Jeremiah, was born. When Jeremiah was 7 months old, Errol began working at the Weatherford Post Office as a part-time flex clerk-carrier — a position which no longer exists. After 5 years at the post office, she gave birth to her third child, Zachary.

While Errol’s children were growing up, they all played soccer, She said in their younger years, they played recreational soccer, which meant practice during the week and games in neighboring towns Saturday.

“I remember one Saturday, during my 2-hour lunch break, I drove to Elk City to watch my two older children play,” Errol said. “I was lucky enough to have them playing on adjacent fields, so I would take turns watching the different fields. I got to watch a total of 30 minutes before heading back to finish my shift, but during that time, I got to see my son score a goal. It’s crazy what we do for our children, isn’t it?”

Her husband Kim started coaching soccer when Zach, their youngest, started playing in the 6 and younger group. She said there was a shortage of coaches and referees, so Kim did both. Errol said she assisted him and eventually became a referee, which led to “lots of running up and down the field.”

“I couldn’t do that today if I tried,” Errol said.

As Errol’s children grew older, the trio played high school soccer until they graduated. Errol said Kim and she were very involved in the high school soccer program, with Kim being the president for 2 years. Errol was the secretary for several years. She also was the concessions stand coordinator for some time.

“I still enjoy watching soccer games — from the younger players through the professional games we watch on television,” Errol said.

Errol continued to work at the post office for 32 years, often reporting to work as early as 3:30 a.m. to sort mail for the carriers to deliver and the clerks to box. Once the boxes were filled, Errol said she would take a lunch and return to work the window until her shift was up. She said she still wakes up early — usually between 5-6 a.m., which Errol doesn’t mind because she “likes to watch the world wake up.”

While Errol worked at the post office, it was not unusual to work up to 12 hours a day as well as 8 hours Saturday and a few hours on Sunday.

During the 1980s oil boom, the population of Weatherford grew immensely. Errol said the mail was never completely sorted through the day, and the sorters had to determine which mail would have to take precedence. After everything settled, all the mail got sorted and work hours shrunk to 4-8 hours.

Errol also was required to carry mail out to customer’s homes or businesses at times if the office was short on carriers.

“I remember when the city received a snow almost knee deep,” Errol said. “Every able-bodied employee helped deliver the mail. I took my own vehicle — a Ford Bronco — to the street to carry the required amount of mail I needed to deliver. Every time I would start out with the heavy pouch on my shoulder, I would think, “This has to be the last loop. I am just getting too tired.”’

However, Errol would return to her vehicle with an empty bag, refill it and begin another loop until all the mail was delivered. One of her final deliveries was to a couple of elderly ladies who had a mail receptacle too small for their mail.

“I knocked on their door, and when one of them answered, the most wonderful smell greeted me,” Errol said. “I mentioned how delicious the smell was, and she told me they had been baking bread all day. She fetched a loaf and said, ‘Here, take one with you.’ It was like a reward for sticking out the day.”

Errol continued to work for the Weatherford Post Office until she retired in 2012. She said she misses her customers very much.

“When I go about town and see one of them, we always have a nice visit,” she said. “There are several who, when I see them, I know we will have a great laugh while we are visiting — and I am never disappointed.”

Kim also retired about the same time. Since the couple had begun to raise cattle on a part-time basis years before, they decided to keep themselves busy with the business.

“Boy, were we busy and still are,” Errol said.

She said they both love working with cattle, especially watching the calves frolicking about. However, the cattle business is not an easy one. Errol said they never know what they will find when they feed and check on the cattle or what the cattle will sell for.

Errol said Kim decided the family needed to begin trout fishing during the early months of the year.

“We have great luck with that, often catching our limit when we go, which was often 1-2 days a week,” Errol said. “Sometimes, we will meet our son and granddaughter, rent a cabin and make weekend of it.”

Errol said she once caught a rare fish for dinner.

“I was reeling in a fish and it flashed gold,” she said. “It turned out to be a golden rainbow trout, which aren’t very plentiful. It was so beautiful I wanted to release it. However, the trout die during the summer months due to the temperature being too warm for them to live, so I took it home and had it for dinner.”

Errol said she still loves getting out and seeing her friends in Weatherford.

“I have a very special friend in my neighbor Carol,” Errol said. “She will come to my house, and we will sit on the front porch and visit — sometimes about serious situations, sometimes just to have some laughs.”

One particular laugh was caused by a snake which slithered in front of the pair during one of their porch sessions.

“Imagine the excitement we had as we took some pictures to send to our children,” Errol said. “I laughed as I told Carol I was sending it to my younger son. It would make his hair stand on end. When we asked him about it later, he said it did make his hand stand up and his wife thought it was hilarious.”

While reflecting on her life, Errol said she enjoys being retired but would not trade any experiences or memories for anything.


Phones, coffee, life

Errol Grossman was born in Elk city and was raised on a ranch northwest of Elk City.

As a young child, she would often spend the night with her grandparents who lived 2 miles from her home. She said she remembers calling her grandma on what her parents called the “whoop and hollar” phone, which was actually a telephone in a big, wooden box with a crank on one side and an earpiece which resembled a small megaphone.

The crank was used to “ring” the people you wanted to talk to. Errol said she remembers her parents’ ring was two long rings and one short ring, while her grandma’s ring was one long, one short and one long.

One day, Errol called her grandma and some woman had the nerve to say “operator” in her ear. Errol said, “I want my grandma,” and her grandmother answered shortly.

After that style telephone discontinued, her family got a rotary desk telephone and were assigned their own telephone number — Capital 1-2248 — and the people in the community were placed on a “party line.” This meant any of the neighbors on that line could listen in on any of the other people’s conversations.

Errol said her mother often ended her conversation with her aunt with, “Goodbye, Jewel (the aunt). Goodbye, Alice (the neighbor).” Errol said there weren’t many secrets in her neighborhood.

As a child, Errol said she remembers the delicious smell of coffee brewing while her mother was making breakfast for her dad. She couldn’t wait until she was 16 “so I could have a cup.”

“Boy was I surprised,” Errol said. “It was the worst thing I had ever tasted.”

She said her Dad always rose before the children, ate breakfast and went to work. He had a bulldozer business and would do work for various people across the country. Once he left, Errol’s mother would let the children sleep in, at least in the summer time. Once they had awakened for the day and had breakfast, Errol’s mother would take the children to the large garden. Each of the seven children — Errol was the middle child — helped, no matter their age.

“To this day, I love gardening and plant a large one every year, even though my children are grown and no longer live with us,” Errol said. “Sometimes it does well and sometimes not, but I almost can guarantee the okra will produce.”

When Errol’s children were young, they would help her gather the vegetables — usually squash, green beans, okra and tomatoes — and her sons would sell them at the farmer’s market, which was located at the intersection of Franklin and Broadway in Weatherford.

The sale of vegetables provided them with extra spending money during the summer months and helped Errol “keep up” with the vegetables. She also did a lot of canning and froze a lot of okra to enjoy in the winter months.

Once the outside temperature got hot, the family would return to the house to clean it and complete chores. The home had no air conditioner, so they kept the windows open at all times in the summer — unless it rained.

Errol’s chore was cleaning the bathroom. She said she didn’t like it much, but it had to be done. The family did chores until lunch, which consisted of a home-cooked meal, usually beef. Errol’s dad raised cattle and would occasionally have an animal butchered to provide food for his family.

Sometimes it would be fried chicken, which would be “harvested” from their yard to cook and enjoy. Errol’s family raised chickens and always had plenty of fresh eggs for breakfast, for ice cream or to sell if there were extra.

Dinner was usually something simple for Errol and her siblings. Her dad would get a get a good meal when her returned home, usually after the kids were fed and in bed for the night. Even though the days were long, Errol’s dad still would find time to spend with his children — usually on the weekends.

Since Errol was raised in the country, more often than not, the home did not have television reception, so Errol and her siblings would spend many hours playing outside in the creeks and countryside. Errol said there was a place which had washed out along the bank of a field beside the road near their house. She said it had so many different colors of sand they called it their “sand store” and played there for hours on end.

Errol said they also had several ponds on her dad’s land, had names which are still used to this day. Errol and her siblings had a favorite pond where they would swim almost daily during the summer, often making a freezer of homemade ice cream to enjoy when they returned to the house — usually vanilla with homemade chocolate syrup.

Errol was raised in a one and a half story house, and when she was in her pre-teens, her father bought another house and moved it beside the first one. He connected the two, adding much-needed room for the family. Errol and her siblings finally got to have a bedroom which didn’t have four or five other people sleeping in the same room.

Errol went to school at Merritt, graduating in a class of 13.

“I dated very few of my classmates, as some of them started first grade together — we didn’t have kindergarten — and continued to go through school for the next 12 years together,” Errol said. “We knew each other so well dating almost would have been like dating my brothers.”

Errol’s graduating class had eight boys and five girls. Occasionally, the class would lose some of their classmates due to families moving away. Some years they would gain one or two as more families moved into the community She said it was always a pleasure to welcome new friends.

“All of the classmates I graduated with are still alive,” Errol said. “I see some of them frequently. It’s always a good time to catch up on what’s going on with all of them.”

After graduating high school, Errol continued her education at SWOSU. Her class was the first to graduate after Southwestern Oklahoma State was declared a university. She married her husband Kim between her junior and senior years in college. This year they celebrated their 46th anniversary.

After graduating from SWOSU, Errol started working for Ken and Phyllis Reid at the Weatherford Daily News and met current Publisher Phillip Reid, who still was in high school at the time.

“We formed a close friendship, which we still have to this day,” Errol said. “I remember when I was pregnant with my daughter and went to tell Ken. He asked ‘Why did Phillip already know?’”

Errol left the WDN after the birth of her first child Autumn and worked as a mother and homemaker for 18 months. Then her second child, Jeremiah, was born. When Jeremiah was 7 months old, Errol began working at the Weatherford Post Office as a part-time flex clerk-carrier — a position which no longer exists. After 5 years at the post office, she gave birth to her third child, Zachary.

While Errol’s children were growing up, they all played soccer, She said in their younger years, they played recreational soccer, which meant practice during the week and games in neighboring towns Saturday.

“I remember one Saturday, during my 2-hour lunch break, I drove to Elk City to watch my two older children play,” Errol said. “I was lucky enough to have them playing on adjacent fields, so I would take turns watching the different fields. I got to watch a total of 30 minutes before heading back to finish my shift, but during that time, I got to see my son score a goal. It’s crazy what we do for our children, isn’t it?”

Her husband Kim started coaching soccer when Zach, their youngest, started playing in the 6 and younger group. She said there was a shortage of coaches and referees, so Kim did both. Errol said she assisted him and eventually became a referee, which led to “lots of running up and down the field.”

“I couldn’t do that today if I tried,” Errol said.

As Errol’s children grew older, the trio played high school soccer until they graduated. Errol said Kim and she were very involved in the high school soccer program, with Kim being the president for 2 years. Errol was the secretary for several years. She also was the concessions stand coordinator for some time.

“I still enjoy watching soccer games — from the younger players through the professional games we watch on television,” Errol said.

Errol continued to work at the post office for 32 years, often reporting to work as early as 3:30 a.m. to sort mail for the carriers to deliver and the clerks to box. Once the boxes were filled, Errol said she would take a lunch and return to work the window until her shift was up. She said she still wakes up early — usually between 5-6 a.m., which Errol doesn’t mind because she “likes to watch the world wake up.”

While Errol worked at the post office, it was not unusual to work up to 12 hours a day as well as 8 hours Saturday and a few hours on Sunday.

During the 1980s oil boom, the population of Weatherford grew immensely. Errol said the mail was never completely sorted through the day, and the sorters had to determine which mail would have to take precedence. After everything settled, all the mail got sorted and work hours shrunk to 4-8 hours.

Errol also was required to carry mail out to customer’s homes or businesses at times if the office was short on carriers.

“I remember when the city received a snow almost knee deep,” Errol said. “Every able-bodied employee helped deliver the mail. I took my own vehicle — a Ford Bronco — to the street to carry the required amount of mail I needed to deliver. Every time I would start out with the heavy pouch on my shoulder, I would think, “This has to be the last loop. I am just getting too tired.”’

However, Errol would return to her vehicle with an empty bag, refill it and begin another loop until all the mail was delivered. One of her final deliveries was to a couple of elderly ladies who had a mail receptacle too small for their mail.

“I knocked on their door, and when one of them answered, the most wonderful smell greeted me,” Errol said. “I mentioned how delicious the smell was, and she told me they had been baking bread all day. She fetched a loaf and said, ‘Here, take one with you.’ It was like a reward for sticking out the day.”

Errol continued to work for the Weatherford Post Office until she retired in 2012. She said she misses her customers very much.

“When I go about town and see one of them, we always have a nice visit,” she said. “There are several who, when I see them, I know we will have a great laugh while we are visiting — and I am never disappointed.”

Kim also retired about the same time. Since the couple had begun to raise cattle on a part-time basis years before, they decided to keep themselves busy with the business.

“Boy, were we busy and still are,” Errol said.

She said they both love working with cattle, especially watching the calves frolicking about. However, the cattle business is not an easy one. Errol said they never know what they will find when they feed and check on the cattle or what the cattle will sell for.

Errol said Kim decided the family needed to begin trout fishing during the early months of the year.

“We have great luck with that, often catching our limit when we go, which was often 1-2 days a week,” Errol said. “Sometimes, we will meet our son and granddaughter, rent a cabin and make weekend of it.”

Errol said she once caught a rare fish for dinner.

“I was reeling in a fish and it flashed gold,” she said. “It turned out to be a golden rainbow trout, which aren’t very plentiful. It was so beautiful I wanted to release it. However, the trout die during the summer months due to the temperature being too warm for them to live, so I took it home and had it for dinner.”

Errol said she still loves getting out and seeing her friends in Weatherford.

“I have a very special friend in my neighbor Carol,” Errol said. “She will come to my house, and we will sit on the front porch and visit — sometimes about serious situations, sometimes just to have some laughs.”

One particular laugh was caused by a snake which slithered in front of the pair during one of their porch sessions.

“Imagine the excitement we had as we took some pictures to send to our children,” Errol said. “I laughed as I told Carol I was sending it to my younger son. It would make his hair stand on end. When we asked him about it later, he said it did make his hand stand up and his wife thought it was hilarious.”

While reflecting on her life, Errol said she enjoys being retired but would not trade any experiences or memories for anything.


Phones, coffee, life

Errol Grossman was born in Elk city and was raised on a ranch northwest of Elk City.

As a young child, she would often spend the night with her grandparents who lived 2 miles from her home. She said she remembers calling her grandma on what her parents called the “whoop and hollar” phone, which was actually a telephone in a big, wooden box with a crank on one side and an earpiece which resembled a small megaphone.

The crank was used to “ring” the people you wanted to talk to. Errol said she remembers her parents’ ring was two long rings and one short ring, while her grandma’s ring was one long, one short and one long.

One day, Errol called her grandma and some woman had the nerve to say “operator” in her ear. Errol said, “I want my grandma,” and her grandmother answered shortly.

After that style telephone discontinued, her family got a rotary desk telephone and were assigned their own telephone number — Capital 1-2248 — and the people in the community were placed on a “party line.” This meant any of the neighbors on that line could listen in on any of the other people’s conversations.

Errol said her mother often ended her conversation with her aunt with, “Goodbye, Jewel (the aunt). Goodbye, Alice (the neighbor).” Errol said there weren’t many secrets in her neighborhood.

As a child, Errol said she remembers the delicious smell of coffee brewing while her mother was making breakfast for her dad. She couldn’t wait until she was 16 “so I could have a cup.”

“Boy was I surprised,” Errol said. “It was the worst thing I had ever tasted.”

She said her Dad always rose before the children, ate breakfast and went to work. He had a bulldozer business and would do work for various people across the country. Once he left, Errol’s mother would let the children sleep in, at least in the summer time. Once they had awakened for the day and had breakfast, Errol’s mother would take the children to the large garden. Each of the seven children — Errol was the middle child — helped, no matter their age.

“To this day, I love gardening and plant a large one every year, even though my children are grown and no longer live with us,” Errol said. “Sometimes it does well and sometimes not, but I almost can guarantee the okra will produce.”

When Errol’s children were young, they would help her gather the vegetables — usually squash, green beans, okra and tomatoes — and her sons would sell them at the farmer’s market, which was located at the intersection of Franklin and Broadway in Weatherford.

The sale of vegetables provided them with extra spending money during the summer months and helped Errol “keep up” with the vegetables. She also did a lot of canning and froze a lot of okra to enjoy in the winter months.

Once the outside temperature got hot, the family would return to the house to clean it and complete chores. The home had no air conditioner, so they kept the windows open at all times in the summer — unless it rained.

Errol’s chore was cleaning the bathroom. She said she didn’t like it much, but it had to be done. The family did chores until lunch, which consisted of a home-cooked meal, usually beef. Errol’s dad raised cattle and would occasionally have an animal butchered to provide food for his family.

Sometimes it would be fried chicken, which would be “harvested” from their yard to cook and enjoy. Errol’s family raised chickens and always had plenty of fresh eggs for breakfast, for ice cream or to sell if there were extra.

Dinner was usually something simple for Errol and her siblings. Her dad would get a get a good meal when her returned home, usually after the kids were fed and in bed for the night. Even though the days were long, Errol’s dad still would find time to spend with his children — usually on the weekends.

Since Errol was raised in the country, more often than not, the home did not have television reception, so Errol and her siblings would spend many hours playing outside in the creeks and countryside. Errol said there was a place which had washed out along the bank of a field beside the road near their house. She said it had so many different colors of sand they called it their “sand store” and played there for hours on end.

Errol said they also had several ponds on her dad’s land, had names which are still used to this day. Errol and her siblings had a favorite pond where they would swim almost daily during the summer, often making a freezer of homemade ice cream to enjoy when they returned to the house — usually vanilla with homemade chocolate syrup.

Errol was raised in a one and a half story house, and when she was in her pre-teens, her father bought another house and moved it beside the first one. He connected the two, adding much-needed room for the family. Errol and her siblings finally got to have a bedroom which didn’t have four or five other people sleeping in the same room.

Errol went to school at Merritt, graduating in a class of 13.

“I dated very few of my classmates, as some of them started first grade together — we didn’t have kindergarten — and continued to go through school for the next 12 years together,” Errol said. “We knew each other so well dating almost would have been like dating my brothers.”

Errol’s graduating class had eight boys and five girls. Occasionally, the class would lose some of their classmates due to families moving away. Some years they would gain one or two as more families moved into the community She said it was always a pleasure to welcome new friends.

“All of the classmates I graduated with are still alive,” Errol said. “I see some of them frequently. It’s always a good time to catch up on what’s going on with all of them.”

After graduating high school, Errol continued her education at SWOSU. Her class was the first to graduate after Southwestern Oklahoma State was declared a university. She married her husband Kim between her junior and senior years in college. This year they celebrated their 46th anniversary.

After graduating from SWOSU, Errol started working for Ken and Phyllis Reid at the Weatherford Daily News and met current Publisher Phillip Reid, who still was in high school at the time.

“We formed a close friendship, which we still have to this day,” Errol said. “I remember when I was pregnant with my daughter and went to tell Ken. He asked ‘Why did Phillip already know?’”

Errol left the WDN after the birth of her first child Autumn and worked as a mother and homemaker for 18 months. Then her second child, Jeremiah, was born. When Jeremiah was 7 months old, Errol began working at the Weatherford Post Office as a part-time flex clerk-carrier — a position which no longer exists. After 5 years at the post office, she gave birth to her third child, Zachary.

While Errol’s children were growing up, they all played soccer, She said in their younger years, they played recreational soccer, which meant practice during the week and games in neighboring towns Saturday.

“I remember one Saturday, during my 2-hour lunch break, I drove to Elk City to watch my two older children play,” Errol said. “I was lucky enough to have them playing on adjacent fields, so I would take turns watching the different fields. I got to watch a total of 30 minutes before heading back to finish my shift, but during that time, I got to see my son score a goal. It’s crazy what we do for our children, isn’t it?”

Her husband Kim started coaching soccer when Zach, their youngest, started playing in the 6 and younger group. She said there was a shortage of coaches and referees, so Kim did both. Errol said she assisted him and eventually became a referee, which led to “lots of running up and down the field.”

“I couldn’t do that today if I tried,” Errol said.

As Errol’s children grew older, the trio played high school soccer until they graduated. Errol said Kim and she were very involved in the high school soccer program, with Kim being the president for 2 years. Errol was the secretary for several years. She also was the concessions stand coordinator for some time.

“I still enjoy watching soccer games — from the younger players through the professional games we watch on television,” Errol said.

Errol continued to work at the post office for 32 years, often reporting to work as early as 3:30 a.m. to sort mail for the carriers to deliver and the clerks to box. Once the boxes were filled, Errol said she would take a lunch and return to work the window until her shift was up. She said she still wakes up early — usually between 5-6 a.m., which Errol doesn’t mind because she “likes to watch the world wake up.”

While Errol worked at the post office, it was not unusual to work up to 12 hours a day as well as 8 hours Saturday and a few hours on Sunday.

During the 1980s oil boom, the population of Weatherford grew immensely. Errol said the mail was never completely sorted through the day, and the sorters had to determine which mail would have to take precedence. After everything settled, all the mail got sorted and work hours shrunk to 4-8 hours.

Errol also was required to carry mail out to customer’s homes or businesses at times if the office was short on carriers.

“I remember when the city received a snow almost knee deep,” Errol said. “Every able-bodied employee helped deliver the mail. I took my own vehicle — a Ford Bronco — to the street to carry the required amount of mail I needed to deliver. Every time I would start out with the heavy pouch on my shoulder, I would think, “This has to be the last loop. I am just getting too tired.”’

However, Errol would return to her vehicle with an empty bag, refill it and begin another loop until all the mail was delivered. One of her final deliveries was to a couple of elderly ladies who had a mail receptacle too small for their mail.

“I knocked on their door, and when one of them answered, the most wonderful smell greeted me,” Errol said. “I mentioned how delicious the smell was, and she told me they had been baking bread all day. She fetched a loaf and said, ‘Here, take one with you.’ It was like a reward for sticking out the day.”

Errol continued to work for the Weatherford Post Office until she retired in 2012. She said she misses her customers very much.

“When I go about town and see one of them, we always have a nice visit,” she said. “There are several who, when I see them, I know we will have a great laugh while we are visiting — and I am never disappointed.”

Kim also retired about the same time. Since the couple had begun to raise cattle on a part-time basis years before, they decided to keep themselves busy with the business.

“Boy, were we busy and still are,” Errol said.

She said they both love working with cattle, especially watching the calves frolicking about. However, the cattle business is not an easy one. Errol said they never know what they will find when they feed and check on the cattle or what the cattle will sell for.

Errol said Kim decided the family needed to begin trout fishing during the early months of the year.

“We have great luck with that, often catching our limit when we go, which was often 1-2 days a week,” Errol said. “Sometimes, we will meet our son and granddaughter, rent a cabin and make weekend of it.”

Errol said she once caught a rare fish for dinner.

“I was reeling in a fish and it flashed gold,” she said. “It turned out to be a golden rainbow trout, which aren’t very plentiful. It was so beautiful I wanted to release it. However, the trout die during the summer months due to the temperature being too warm for them to live, so I took it home and had it for dinner.”

Errol said she still loves getting out and seeing her friends in Weatherford.

“I have a very special friend in my neighbor Carol,” Errol said. “She will come to my house, and we will sit on the front porch and visit — sometimes about serious situations, sometimes just to have some laughs.”

One particular laugh was caused by a snake which slithered in front of the pair during one of their porch sessions.

“Imagine the excitement we had as we took some pictures to send to our children,” Errol said. “I laughed as I told Carol I was sending it to my younger son. It would make his hair stand on end. When we asked him about it later, he said it did make his hand stand up and his wife thought it was hilarious.”

While reflecting on her life, Errol said she enjoys being retired but would not trade any experiences or memories for anything.


Phones, coffee, life

Errol Grossman was born in Elk city and was raised on a ranch northwest of Elk City.

As a young child, she would often spend the night with her grandparents who lived 2 miles from her home. She said she remembers calling her grandma on what her parents called the “whoop and hollar” phone, which was actually a telephone in a big, wooden box with a crank on one side and an earpiece which resembled a small megaphone.

The crank was used to “ring” the people you wanted to talk to. Errol said she remembers her parents’ ring was two long rings and one short ring, while her grandma’s ring was one long, one short and one long.

One day, Errol called her grandma and some woman had the nerve to say “operator” in her ear. Errol said, “I want my grandma,” and her grandmother answered shortly.

After that style telephone discontinued, her family got a rotary desk telephone and were assigned their own telephone number — Capital 1-2248 — and the people in the community were placed on a “party line.” This meant any of the neighbors on that line could listen in on any of the other people’s conversations.

Errol said her mother often ended her conversation with her aunt with, “Goodbye, Jewel (the aunt). Goodbye, Alice (the neighbor).” Errol said there weren’t many secrets in her neighborhood.

As a child, Errol said she remembers the delicious smell of coffee brewing while her mother was making breakfast for her dad. She couldn’t wait until she was 16 “so I could have a cup.”

“Boy was I surprised,” Errol said. “It was the worst thing I had ever tasted.”

She said her Dad always rose before the children, ate breakfast and went to work. He had a bulldozer business and would do work for various people across the country. Once he left, Errol’s mother would let the children sleep in, at least in the summer time. Once they had awakened for the day and had breakfast, Errol’s mother would take the children to the large garden. Each of the seven children — Errol was the middle child — helped, no matter their age.

“To this day, I love gardening and plant a large one every year, even though my children are grown and no longer live with us,” Errol said. “Sometimes it does well and sometimes not, but I almost can guarantee the okra will produce.”

When Errol’s children were young, they would help her gather the vegetables — usually squash, green beans, okra and tomatoes — and her sons would sell them at the farmer’s market, which was located at the intersection of Franklin and Broadway in Weatherford.

The sale of vegetables provided them with extra spending money during the summer months and helped Errol “keep up” with the vegetables. She also did a lot of canning and froze a lot of okra to enjoy in the winter months.

Once the outside temperature got hot, the family would return to the house to clean it and complete chores. The home had no air conditioner, so they kept the windows open at all times in the summer — unless it rained.

Errol’s chore was cleaning the bathroom. She said she didn’t like it much, but it had to be done. The family did chores until lunch, which consisted of a home-cooked meal, usually beef. Errol’s dad raised cattle and would occasionally have an animal butchered to provide food for his family.

Sometimes it would be fried chicken, which would be “harvested” from their yard to cook and enjoy. Errol’s family raised chickens and always had plenty of fresh eggs for breakfast, for ice cream or to sell if there were extra.

Dinner was usually something simple for Errol and her siblings. Her dad would get a get a good meal when her returned home, usually after the kids were fed and in bed for the night. Even though the days were long, Errol’s dad still would find time to spend with his children — usually on the weekends.

Since Errol was raised in the country, more often than not, the home did not have television reception, so Errol and her siblings would spend many hours playing outside in the creeks and countryside. Errol said there was a place which had washed out along the bank of a field beside the road near their house. She said it had so many different colors of sand they called it their “sand store” and played there for hours on end.

Errol said they also had several ponds on her dad’s land, had names which are still used to this day. Errol and her siblings had a favorite pond where they would swim almost daily during the summer, often making a freezer of homemade ice cream to enjoy when they returned to the house — usually vanilla with homemade chocolate syrup.

Errol was raised in a one and a half story house, and when she was in her pre-teens, her father bought another house and moved it beside the first one. He connected the two, adding much-needed room for the family. Errol and her siblings finally got to have a bedroom which didn’t have four or five other people sleeping in the same room.

Errol went to school at Merritt, graduating in a class of 13.

“I dated very few of my classmates, as some of them started first grade together — we didn’t have kindergarten — and continued to go through school for the next 12 years together,” Errol said. “We knew each other so well dating almost would have been like dating my brothers.”

Errol’s graduating class had eight boys and five girls. Occasionally, the class would lose some of their classmates due to families moving away. Some years they would gain one or two as more families moved into the community She said it was always a pleasure to welcome new friends.

“All of the classmates I graduated with are still alive,” Errol said. “I see some of them frequently. It’s always a good time to catch up on what’s going on with all of them.”

After graduating high school, Errol continued her education at SWOSU. Her class was the first to graduate after Southwestern Oklahoma State was declared a university. She married her husband Kim between her junior and senior years in college. This year they celebrated their 46th anniversary.

After graduating from SWOSU, Errol started working for Ken and Phyllis Reid at the Weatherford Daily News and met current Publisher Phillip Reid, who still was in high school at the time.

“We formed a close friendship, which we still have to this day,” Errol said. “I remember when I was pregnant with my daughter and went to tell Ken. He asked ‘Why did Phillip already know?’”

Errol left the WDN after the birth of her first child Autumn and worked as a mother and homemaker for 18 months. Then her second child, Jeremiah, was born. When Jeremiah was 7 months old, Errol began working at the Weatherford Post Office as a part-time flex clerk-carrier — a position which no longer exists. After 5 years at the post office, she gave birth to her third child, Zachary.

While Errol’s children were growing up, they all played soccer, She said in their younger years, they played recreational soccer, which meant practice during the week and games in neighboring towns Saturday.

“I remember one Saturday, during my 2-hour lunch break, I drove to Elk City to watch my two older children play,” Errol said. “I was lucky enough to have them playing on adjacent fields, so I would take turns watching the different fields. I got to watch a total of 30 minutes before heading back to finish my shift, but during that time, I got to see my son score a goal. It’s crazy what we do for our children, isn’t it?”

Her husband Kim started coaching soccer when Zach, their youngest, started playing in the 6 and younger group. She said there was a shortage of coaches and referees, so Kim did both. Errol said she assisted him and eventually became a referee, which led to “lots of running up and down the field.”

“I couldn’t do that today if I tried,” Errol said.

As Errol’s children grew older, the trio played high school soccer until they graduated. Errol said Kim and she were very involved in the high school soccer program, with Kim being the president for 2 years. Errol was the secretary for several years. She also was the concessions stand coordinator for some time.

“I still enjoy watching soccer games — from the younger players through the professional games we watch on television,” Errol said.

Errol continued to work at the post office for 32 years, often reporting to work as early as 3:30 a.m. to sort mail for the carriers to deliver and the clerks to box. Once the boxes were filled, Errol said she would take a lunch and return to work the window until her shift was up. She said she still wakes up early — usually between 5-6 a.m., which Errol doesn’t mind because she “likes to watch the world wake up.”

While Errol worked at the post office, it was not unusual to work up to 12 hours a day as well as 8 hours Saturday and a few hours on Sunday.

During the 1980s oil boom, the population of Weatherford grew immensely. Errol said the mail was never completely sorted through the day, and the sorters had to determine which mail would have to take precedence. After everything settled, all the mail got sorted and work hours shrunk to 4-8 hours.

Errol also was required to carry mail out to customer’s homes or businesses at times if the office was short on carriers.

“I remember when the city received a snow almost knee deep,” Errol said. “Every able-bodied employee helped deliver the mail. I took my own vehicle — a Ford Bronco — to the street to carry the required amount of mail I needed to deliver. Every time I would start out with the heavy pouch on my shoulder, I would think, “This has to be the last loop. I am just getting too tired.”’

However, Errol would return to her vehicle with an empty bag, refill it and begin another loop until all the mail was delivered. One of her final deliveries was to a couple of elderly ladies who had a mail receptacle too small for their mail.

“I knocked on their door, and when one of them answered, the most wonderful smell greeted me,” Errol said. “I mentioned how delicious the smell was, and she told me they had been baking bread all day. She fetched a loaf and said, ‘Here, take one with you.’ It was like a reward for sticking out the day.”

Errol continued to work for the Weatherford Post Office until she retired in 2012. She said she misses her customers very much.

“When I go about town and see one of them, we always have a nice visit,” she said. “There are several who, when I see them, I know we will have a great laugh while we are visiting — and I am never disappointed.”

Kim also retired about the same time. Since the couple had begun to raise cattle on a part-time basis years before, they decided to keep themselves busy with the business.

“Boy, were we busy and still are,” Errol said.

She said they both love working with cattle, especially watching the calves frolicking about. However, the cattle business is not an easy one. Errol said they never know what they will find when they feed and check on the cattle or what the cattle will sell for.

Errol said Kim decided the family needed to begin trout fishing during the early months of the year.

“We have great luck with that, often catching our limit when we go, which was often 1-2 days a week,” Errol said. “Sometimes, we will meet our son and granddaughter, rent a cabin and make weekend of it.”

Errol said she once caught a rare fish for dinner.

“I was reeling in a fish and it flashed gold,” she said. “It turned out to be a golden rainbow trout, which aren’t very plentiful. It was so beautiful I wanted to release it. However, the trout die during the summer months due to the temperature being too warm for them to live, so I took it home and had it for dinner.”

Errol said she still loves getting out and seeing her friends in Weatherford.

“I have a very special friend in my neighbor Carol,” Errol said. “She will come to my house, and we will sit on the front porch and visit — sometimes about serious situations, sometimes just to have some laughs.”

One particular laugh was caused by a snake which slithered in front of the pair during one of their porch sessions.

“Imagine the excitement we had as we took some pictures to send to our children,” Errol said. “I laughed as I told Carol I was sending it to my younger son. It would make his hair stand on end. When we asked him about it later, he said it did make his hand stand up and his wife thought it was hilarious.”

While reflecting on her life, Errol said she enjoys being retired but would not trade any experiences or memories for anything.


Phones, coffee, life

Errol Grossman was born in Elk city and was raised on a ranch northwest of Elk City.

As a young child, she would often spend the night with her grandparents who lived 2 miles from her home. She said she remembers calling her grandma on what her parents called the “whoop and hollar” phone, which was actually a telephone in a big, wooden box with a crank on one side and an earpiece which resembled a small megaphone.

The crank was used to “ring” the people you wanted to talk to. Errol said she remembers her parents’ ring was two long rings and one short ring, while her grandma’s ring was one long, one short and one long.

One day, Errol called her grandma and some woman had the nerve to say “operator” in her ear. Errol said, “I want my grandma,” and her grandmother answered shortly.

After that style telephone discontinued, her family got a rotary desk telephone and were assigned their own telephone number — Capital 1-2248 — and the people in the community were placed on a “party line.” This meant any of the neighbors on that line could listen in on any of the other people’s conversations.

Errol said her mother often ended her conversation with her aunt with, “Goodbye, Jewel (the aunt). Goodbye, Alice (the neighbor).” Errol said there weren’t many secrets in her neighborhood.

As a child, Errol said she remembers the delicious smell of coffee brewing while her mother was making breakfast for her dad. She couldn’t wait until she was 16 “so I could have a cup.”

“Boy was I surprised,” Errol said. “It was the worst thing I had ever tasted.”

She said her Dad always rose before the children, ate breakfast and went to work. He had a bulldozer business and would do work for various people across the country. Once he left, Errol’s mother would let the children sleep in, at least in the summer time. Once they had awakened for the day and had breakfast, Errol’s mother would take the children to the large garden. Each of the seven children — Errol was the middle child — helped, no matter their age.

“To this day, I love gardening and plant a large one every year, even though my children are grown and no longer live with us,” Errol said. “Sometimes it does well and sometimes not, but I almost can guarantee the okra will produce.”

When Errol’s children were young, they would help her gather the vegetables — usually squash, green beans, okra and tomatoes — and her sons would sell them at the farmer’s market, which was located at the intersection of Franklin and Broadway in Weatherford.

The sale of vegetables provided them with extra spending money during the summer months and helped Errol “keep up” with the vegetables. She also did a lot of canning and froze a lot of okra to enjoy in the winter months.

Once the outside temperature got hot, the family would return to the house to clean it and complete chores. The home had no air conditioner, so they kept the windows open at all times in the summer — unless it rained.

Errol’s chore was cleaning the bathroom. She said she didn’t like it much, but it had to be done. The family did chores until lunch, which consisted of a home-cooked meal, usually beef. Errol’s dad raised cattle and would occasionally have an animal butchered to provide food for his family.

Sometimes it would be fried chicken, which would be “harvested” from their yard to cook and enjoy. Errol’s family raised chickens and always had plenty of fresh eggs for breakfast, for ice cream or to sell if there were extra.

Dinner was usually something simple for Errol and her siblings. Her dad would get a get a good meal when her returned home, usually after the kids were fed and in bed for the night. Even though the days were long, Errol’s dad still would find time to spend with his children — usually on the weekends.

Since Errol was raised in the country, more often than not, the home did not have television reception, so Errol and her siblings would spend many hours playing outside in the creeks and countryside. Errol said there was a place which had washed out along the bank of a field beside the road near their house. She said it had so many different colors of sand they called it their “sand store” and played there for hours on end.

Errol said they also had several ponds on her dad’s land, had names which are still used to this day. Errol and her siblings had a favorite pond where they would swim almost daily during the summer, often making a freezer of homemade ice cream to enjoy when they returned to the house — usually vanilla with homemade chocolate syrup.

Errol was raised in a one and a half story house, and when she was in her pre-teens, her father bought another house and moved it beside the first one. He connected the two, adding much-needed room for the family. Errol and her siblings finally got to have a bedroom which didn’t have four or five other people sleeping in the same room.

Errol went to school at Merritt, graduating in a class of 13.

“I dated very few of my classmates, as some of them started first grade together — we didn’t have kindergarten — and continued to go through school for the next 12 years together,” Errol said. “We knew each other so well dating almost would have been like dating my brothers.”

Errol’s graduating class had eight boys and five girls. Occasionally, the class would lose some of their classmates due to families moving away. Some years they would gain one or two as more families moved into the community She said it was always a pleasure to welcome new friends.

“All of the classmates I graduated with are still alive,” Errol said. “I see some of them frequently. It’s always a good time to catch up on what’s going on with all of them.”

After graduating high school, Errol continued her education at SWOSU. Her class was the first to graduate after Southwestern Oklahoma State was declared a university. She married her husband Kim between her junior and senior years in college. This year they celebrated their 46th anniversary.

After graduating from SWOSU, Errol started working for Ken and Phyllis Reid at the Weatherford Daily News and met current Publisher Phillip Reid, who still was in high school at the time.

“We formed a close friendship, which we still have to this day,” Errol said. “I remember when I was pregnant with my daughter and went to tell Ken. He asked ‘Why did Phillip already know?’”

Errol left the WDN after the birth of her first child Autumn and worked as a mother and homemaker for 18 months. Then her second child, Jeremiah, was born. When Jeremiah was 7 months old, Errol began working at the Weatherford Post Office as a part-time flex clerk-carrier — a position which no longer exists. After 5 years at the post office, she gave birth to her third child, Zachary.

While Errol’s children were growing up, they all played soccer, She said in their younger years, they played recreational soccer, which meant practice during the week and games in neighboring towns Saturday.

“I remember one Saturday, during my 2-hour lunch break, I drove to Elk City to watch my two older children play,” Errol said. “I was lucky enough to have them playing on adjacent fields, so I would take turns watching the different fields. I got to watch a total of 30 minutes before heading back to finish my shift, but during that time, I got to see my son score a goal. It’s crazy what we do for our children, isn’t it?”

Her husband Kim started coaching soccer when Zach, their youngest, started playing in the 6 and younger group. She said there was a shortage of coaches and referees, so Kim did both. Errol said she assisted him and eventually became a referee, which led to “lots of running up and down the field.”

“I couldn’t do that today if I tried,” Errol said.

As Errol’s children grew older, the trio played high school soccer until they graduated. Errol said Kim and she were very involved in the high school soccer program, with Kim being the president for 2 years. Errol was the secretary for several years. She also was the concessions stand coordinator for some time.

“I still enjoy watching soccer games — from the younger players through the professional games we watch on television,” Errol said.

Errol continued to work at the post office for 32 years, often reporting to work as early as 3:30 a.m. to sort mail for the carriers to deliver and the clerks to box. Once the boxes were filled, Errol said she would take a lunch and return to work the window until her shift was up. She said she still wakes up early — usually between 5-6 a.m., which Errol doesn’t mind because she “likes to watch the world wake up.”

While Errol worked at the post office, it was not unusual to work up to 12 hours a day as well as 8 hours Saturday and a few hours on Sunday.

During the 1980s oil boom, the population of Weatherford grew immensely. Errol said the mail was never completely sorted through the day, and the sorters had to determine which mail would have to take precedence. After everything settled, all the mail got sorted and work hours shrunk to 4-8 hours.

Errol also was required to carry mail out to customer’s homes or businesses at times if the office was short on carriers.

“I remember when the city received a snow almost knee deep,” Errol said. “Every able-bodied employee helped deliver the mail. I took my own vehicle — a Ford Bronco — to the street to carry the required amount of mail I needed to deliver. Every time I would start out with the heavy pouch on my shoulder, I would think, “This has to be the last loop. I am just getting too tired.”’

However, Errol would return to her vehicle with an empty bag, refill it and begin another loop until all the mail was delivered. One of her final deliveries was to a couple of elderly ladies who had a mail receptacle too small for their mail.

“I knocked on their door, and when one of them answered, the most wonderful smell greeted me,” Errol said. “I mentioned how delicious the smell was, and she told me they had been baking bread all day. She fetched a loaf and said, ‘Here, take one with you.’ It was like a reward for sticking out the day.”

Errol continued to work for the Weatherford Post Office until she retired in 2012. She said she misses her customers very much.

“When I go about town and see one of them, we always have a nice visit,” she said. “There are several who, when I see them, I know we will have a great laugh while we are visiting — and I am never disappointed.”

Kim also retired about the same time. Since the couple had begun to raise cattle on a part-time basis years before, they decided to keep themselves busy with the business.

“Boy, were we busy and still are,” Errol said.

She said they both love working with cattle, especially watching the calves frolicking about. However, the cattle business is not an easy one. Errol said they never know what they will find when they feed and check on the cattle or what the cattle will sell for.

Errol said Kim decided the family needed to begin trout fishing during the early months of the year.

“We have great luck with that, often catching our limit when we go, which was often 1-2 days a week,” Errol said. “Sometimes, we will meet our son and granddaughter, rent a cabin and make weekend of it.”

Errol said she once caught a rare fish for dinner.

“I was reeling in a fish and it flashed gold,” she said. “It turned out to be a golden rainbow trout, which aren’t very plentiful. It was so beautiful I wanted to release it. However, the trout die during the summer months due to the temperature being too warm for them to live, so I took it home and had it for dinner.”

Errol said she still loves getting out and seeing her friends in Weatherford.

“I have a very special friend in my neighbor Carol,” Errol said. “She will come to my house, and we will sit on the front porch and visit — sometimes about serious situations, sometimes just to have some laughs.”

One particular laugh was caused by a snake which slithered in front of the pair during one of their porch sessions.

“Imagine the excitement we had as we took some pictures to send to our children,” Errol said. “I laughed as I told Carol I was sending it to my younger son. It would make his hair stand on end. When we asked him about it later, he said it did make his hand stand up and his wife thought it was hilarious.”

While reflecting on her life, Errol said she enjoys being retired but would not trade any experiences or memories for anything.


Phones, coffee, life

Errol Grossman was born in Elk city and was raised on a ranch northwest of Elk City.

As a young child, she would often spend the night with her grandparents who lived 2 miles from her home. She said she remembers calling her grandma on what her parents called the “whoop and hollar” phone, which was actually a telephone in a big, wooden box with a crank on one side and an earpiece which resembled a small megaphone.

The crank was used to “ring” the people you wanted to talk to. Errol said she remembers her parents’ ring was two long rings and one short ring, while her grandma’s ring was one long, one short and one long.

One day, Errol called her grandma and some woman had the nerve to say “operator” in her ear. Errol said, “I want my grandma,” and her grandmother answered shortly.

After that style telephone discontinued, her family got a rotary desk telephone and were assigned their own telephone number — Capital 1-2248 — and the people in the community were placed on a “party line.” This meant any of the neighbors on that line could listen in on any of the other people’s conversations.

Errol said her mother often ended her conversation with her aunt with, “Goodbye, Jewel (the aunt). Goodbye, Alice (the neighbor).” Errol said there weren’t many secrets in her neighborhood.

As a child, Errol said she remembers the delicious smell of coffee brewing while her mother was making breakfast for her dad. She couldn’t wait until she was 16 “so I could have a cup.”

“Boy was I surprised,” Errol said. “It was the worst thing I had ever tasted.”

She said her Dad always rose before the children, ate breakfast and went to work. He had a bulldozer business and would do work for various people across the country. Once he left, Errol’s mother would let the children sleep in, at least in the summer time. Once they had awakened for the day and had breakfast, Errol’s mother would take the children to the large garden. Each of the seven children — Errol was the middle child — helped, no matter their age.

“To this day, I love gardening and plant a large one every year, even though my children are grown and no longer live with us,” Errol said. “Sometimes it does well and sometimes not, but I almost can guarantee the okra will produce.”

When Errol’s children were young, they would help her gather the vegetables — usually squash, green beans, okra and tomatoes — and her sons would sell them at the farmer’s market, which was located at the intersection of Franklin and Broadway in Weatherford.

The sale of vegetables provided them with extra spending money during the summer months and helped Errol “keep up” with the vegetables. She also did a lot of canning and froze a lot of okra to enjoy in the winter months.

Once the outside temperature got hot, the family would return to the house to clean it and complete chores. The home had no air conditioner, so they kept the windows open at all times in the summer — unless it rained.

Errol’s chore was cleaning the bathroom. She said she didn’t like it much, but it had to be done. The family did chores until lunch, which consisted of a home-cooked meal, usually beef. Errol’s dad raised cattle and would occasionally have an animal butchered to provide food for his family.

Sometimes it would be fried chicken, which would be “harvested” from their yard to cook and enjoy. Errol’s family raised chickens and always had plenty of fresh eggs for breakfast, for ice cream or to sell if there were extra.

Dinner was usually something simple for Errol and her siblings. Her dad would get a get a good meal when her returned home, usually after the kids were fed and in bed for the night. Even though the days were long, Errol’s dad still would find time to spend with his children — usually on the weekends.

Since Errol was raised in the country, more often than not, the home did not have television reception, so Errol and her siblings would spend many hours playing outside in the creeks and countryside. Errol said there was a place which had washed out along the bank of a field beside the road near their house. She said it had so many different colors of sand they called it their “sand store” and played there for hours on end.

Errol said they also had several ponds on her dad’s land, had names which are still used to this day. Errol and her siblings had a favorite pond where they would swim almost daily during the summer, often making a freezer of homemade ice cream to enjoy when they returned to the house — usually vanilla with homemade chocolate syrup.

Errol was raised in a one and a half story house, and when she was in her pre-teens, her father bought another house and moved it beside the first one. He connected the two, adding much-needed room for the family. Errol and her siblings finally got to have a bedroom which didn’t have four or five other people sleeping in the same room.

Errol went to school at Merritt, graduating in a class of 13.

“I dated very few of my classmates, as some of them started first grade together — we didn’t have kindergarten — and continued to go through school for the next 12 years together,” Errol said. “We knew each other so well dating almost would have been like dating my brothers.”

Errol’s graduating class had eight boys and five girls. Occasionally, the class would lose some of their classmates due to families moving away. Some years they would gain one or two as more families moved into the community She said it was always a pleasure to welcome new friends.

“All of the classmates I graduated with are still alive,” Errol said. “I see some of them frequently. It’s always a good time to catch up on what’s going on with all of them.”

After graduating high school, Errol continued her education at SWOSU. Her class was the first to graduate after Southwestern Oklahoma State was declared a university. She married her husband Kim between her junior and senior years in college. This year they celebrated their 46th anniversary.

After graduating from SWOSU, Errol started working for Ken and Phyllis Reid at the Weatherford Daily News and met current Publisher Phillip Reid, who still was in high school at the time.

“We formed a close friendship, which we still have to this day,” Errol said. “I remember when I was pregnant with my daughter and went to tell Ken. He asked ‘Why did Phillip already know?’”

Errol left the WDN after the birth of her first child Autumn and worked as a mother and homemaker for 18 months. Then her second child, Jeremiah, was born. When Jeremiah was 7 months old, Errol began working at the Weatherford Post Office as a part-time flex clerk-carrier — a position which no longer exists. After 5 years at the post office, she gave birth to her third child, Zachary.

While Errol’s children were growing up, they all played soccer, She said in their younger years, they played recreational soccer, which meant practice during the week and games in neighboring towns Saturday.

“I remember one Saturday, during my 2-hour lunch break, I drove to Elk City to watch my two older children play,” Errol said. “I was lucky enough to have them playing on adjacent fields, so I would take turns watching the different fields. I got to watch a total of 30 minutes before heading back to finish my shift, but during that time, I got to see my son score a goal. It’s crazy what we do for our children, isn’t it?”

Her husband Kim started coaching soccer when Zach, their youngest, started playing in the 6 and younger group. She said there was a shortage of coaches and referees, so Kim did both. Errol said she assisted him and eventually became a referee, which led to “lots of running up and down the field.”

“I couldn’t do that today if I tried,” Errol said.

As Errol’s children grew older, the trio played high school soccer until they graduated. Errol said Kim and she were very involved in the high school soccer program, with Kim being the president for 2 years. Errol was the secretary for several years. She also was the concessions stand coordinator for some time.

“I still enjoy watching soccer games — from the younger players through the professional games we watch on television,” Errol said.

Errol continued to work at the post office for 32 years, often reporting to work as early as 3:30 a.m. to sort mail for the carriers to deliver and the clerks to box. Once the boxes were filled, Errol said she would take a lunch and return to work the window until her shift was up. She said she still wakes up early — usually between 5-6 a.m., which Errol doesn’t mind because she “likes to watch the world wake up.”

While Errol worked at the post office, it was not unusual to work up to 12 hours a day as well as 8 hours Saturday and a few hours on Sunday.

During the 1980s oil boom, the population of Weatherford grew immensely. Errol said the mail was never completely sorted through the day, and the sorters had to determine which mail would have to take precedence. After everything settled, all the mail got sorted and work hours shrunk to 4-8 hours.

Errol also was required to carry mail out to customer’s homes or businesses at times if the office was short on carriers.

“I remember when the city received a snow almost knee deep,” Errol said. “Every able-bodied employee helped deliver the mail. I took my own vehicle — a Ford Bronco — to the street to carry the required amount of mail I needed to deliver. Every time I would start out with the heavy pouch on my shoulder, I would think, “This has to be the last loop. I am just getting too tired.”’

However, Errol would return to her vehicle with an empty bag, refill it and begin another loop until all the mail was delivered. One of her final deliveries was to a couple of elderly ladies who had a mail receptacle too small for their mail.

“I knocked on their door, and when one of them answered, the most wonderful smell greeted me,” Errol said. “I mentioned how delicious the smell was, and she told me they had been baking bread all day. She fetched a loaf and said, ‘Here, take one with you.’ It was like a reward for sticking out the day.”

Errol continued to work for the Weatherford Post Office until she retired in 2012. She said she misses her customers very much.

“When I go about town and see one of them, we always have a nice visit,” she said. “There are several who, when I see them, I know we will have a great laugh while we are visiting — and I am never disappointed.”

Kim also retired about the same time. Since the couple had begun to raise cattle on a part-time basis years before, they decided to keep themselves busy with the business.

“Boy, were we busy and still are,” Errol said.

She said they both love working with cattle, especially watching the calves frolicking about. However, the cattle business is not an easy one. Errol said they never know what they will find when they feed and check on the cattle or what the cattle will sell for.

Errol said Kim decided the family needed to begin trout fishing during the early months of the year.

“We have great luck with that, often catching our limit when we go, which was often 1-2 days a week,” Errol said. “Sometimes, we will meet our son and granddaughter, rent a cabin and make weekend of it.”

Errol said she once caught a rare fish for dinner.

“I was reeling in a fish and it flashed gold,” she said. “It turned out to be a golden rainbow trout, which aren’t very plentiful. It was so beautiful I wanted to release it. However, the trout die during the summer months due to the temperature being too warm for them to live, so I took it home and had it for dinner.”

Errol said she still loves getting out and seeing her friends in Weatherford.

“I have a very special friend in my neighbor Carol,” Errol said. “She will come to my house, and we will sit on the front porch and visit — sometimes about serious situations, sometimes just to have some laughs.”

One particular laugh was caused by a snake which slithered in front of the pair during one of their porch sessions.

“Imagine the excitement we had as we took some pictures to send to our children,” Errol said. “I laughed as I told Carol I was sending it to my younger son. It would make his hair stand on end. When we asked him about it later, he said it did make his hand stand up and his wife thought it was hilarious.”

While reflecting on her life, Errol said she enjoys being retired but would not trade any experiences or memories for anything.


Phones, coffee, life

Errol Grossman was born in Elk city and was raised on a ranch northwest of Elk City.

As a young child, she would often spend the night with her grandparents who lived 2 miles from her home. She said she remembers calling her grandma on what her parents called the “whoop and hollar” phone, which was actually a telephone in a big, wooden box with a crank on one side and an earpiece which resembled a small megaphone.

The crank was used to “ring” the people you wanted to talk to. Errol said she remembers her parents’ ring was two long rings and one short ring, while her grandma’s ring was one long, one short and one long.

One day, Errol called her grandma and some woman had the nerve to say “operator” in her ear. Errol said, “I want my grandma,” and her grandmother answered shortly.

After that style telephone discontinued, her family got a rotary desk telephone and were assigned their own telephone number — Capital 1-2248 — and the people in the community were placed on a “party line.” This meant any of the neighbors on that line could listen in on any of the other people’s conversations.

Errol said her mother often ended her conversation with her aunt with, “Goodbye, Jewel (the aunt). Goodbye, Alice (the neighbor).” Errol said there weren’t many secrets in her neighborhood.

As a child, Errol said she remembers the delicious smell of coffee brewing while her mother was making breakfast for her dad. She couldn’t wait until she was 16 “so I could have a cup.”

“Boy was I surprised,” Errol said. “It was the worst thing I had ever tasted.”

She said her Dad always rose before the children, ate breakfast and went to work. He had a bulldozer business and would do work for various people across the country. Once he left, Errol’s mother would let the children sleep in, at least in the summer time. Once they had awakened for the day and had breakfast, Errol’s mother would take the children to the large garden. Each of the seven children — Errol was the middle child — helped, no matter their age.

“To this day, I love gardening and plant a large one every year, even though my children are grown and no longer live with us,” Errol said. “Sometimes it does well and sometimes not, but I almost can guarantee the okra will produce.”

When Errol’s children were young, they would help her gather the vegetables — usually squash, green beans, okra and tomatoes — and her sons would sell them at the farmer’s market, which was located at the intersection of Franklin and Broadway in Weatherford.

The sale of vegetables provided them with extra spending money during the summer months and helped Errol “keep up” with the vegetables. She also did a lot of canning and froze a lot of okra to enjoy in the winter months.

Once the outside temperature got hot, the family would return to the house to clean it and complete chores. The home had no air conditioner, so they kept the windows open at all times in the summer — unless it rained.

Errol’s chore was cleaning the bathroom. She said she didn’t like it much, but it had to be done. The family did chores until lunch, which consisted of a home-cooked meal, usually beef. Errol’s dad raised cattle and would occasionally have an animal butchered to provide food for his family.

Sometimes it would be fried chicken, which would be “harvested” from their yard to cook and enjoy. Errol’s family raised chickens and always had plenty of fresh eggs for breakfast, for ice cream or to sell if there were extra.

Dinner was usually something simple for Errol and her siblings. Her dad would get a get a good meal when her returned home, usually after the kids were fed and in bed for the night. Even though the days were long, Errol’s dad still would find time to spend with his children — usually on the weekends.

Since Errol was raised in the country, more often than not, the home did not have television reception, so Errol and her siblings would spend many hours playing outside in the creeks and countryside. Errol said there was a place which had washed out along the bank of a field beside the road near their house. She said it had so many different colors of sand they called it their “sand store” and played there for hours on end.

Errol said they also had several ponds on her dad’s land, had names which are still used to this day. Errol and her siblings had a favorite pond where they would swim almost daily during the summer, often making a freezer of homemade ice cream to enjoy when they returned to the house — usually vanilla with homemade chocolate syrup.

Errol was raised in a one and a half story house, and when she was in her pre-teens, her father bought another house and moved it beside the first one. He connected the two, adding much-needed room for the family. Errol and her siblings finally got to have a bedroom which didn’t have four or five other people sleeping in the same room.

Errol went to school at Merritt, graduating in a class of 13.

“I dated very few of my classmates, as some of them started first grade together — we didn’t have kindergarten — and continued to go through school for the next 12 years together,” Errol said. “We knew each other so well dating almost would have been like dating my brothers.”

Errol’s graduating class had eight boys and five girls. Occasionally, the class would lose some of their classmates due to families moving away. Some years they would gain one or two as more families moved into the community She said it was always a pleasure to welcome new friends.

“All of the classmates I graduated with are still alive,” Errol said. “I see some of them frequently. It’s always a good time to catch up on what’s going on with all of them.”

After graduating high school, Errol continued her education at SWOSU. Her class was the first to graduate after Southwestern Oklahoma State was declared a university. She married her husband Kim between her junior and senior years in college. This year they celebrated their 46th anniversary.

After graduating from SWOSU, Errol started working for Ken and Phyllis Reid at the Weatherford Daily News and met current Publisher Phillip Reid, who still was in high school at the time.

“We formed a close friendship, which we still have to this day,” Errol said. “I remember when I was pregnant with my daughter and went to tell Ken. He asked ‘Why did Phillip already know?’”

Errol left the WDN after the birth of her first child Autumn and worked as a mother and homemaker for 18 months. Then her second child, Jeremiah, was born. When Jeremiah was 7 months old, Errol began working at the Weatherford Post Office as a part-time flex clerk-carrier — a position which no longer exists. After 5 years at the post office, she gave birth to her third child, Zachary.

While Errol’s children were growing up, they all played soccer, She said in their younger years, they played recreational soccer, which meant practice during the week and games in neighboring towns Saturday.

“I remember one Saturday, during my 2-hour lunch break, I drove to Elk City to watch my two older children play,” Errol said. “I was lucky enough to have them playing on adjacent fields, so I would take turns watching the different fields. I got to watch a total of 30 minutes before heading back to finish my shift, but during that time, I got to see my son score a goal. It’s crazy what we do for our children, isn’t it?”

Her husband Kim started coaching soccer when Zach, their youngest, started playing in the 6 and younger group. She said there was a shortage of coaches and referees, so Kim did both. Errol said she assisted him and eventually became a referee, which led to “lots of running up and down the field.”

“I couldn’t do that today if I tried,” Errol said.

As Errol’s children grew older, the trio played high school soccer until they graduated. Errol said Kim and she were very involved in the high school soccer program, with Kim being the president for 2 years. Errol was the secretary for several years. She also was the concessions stand coordinator for some time.

“I still enjoy watching soccer games — from the younger players through the professional games we watch on television,” Errol said.

Errol continued to work at the post office for 32 years, often reporting to work as early as 3:30 a.m. to sort mail for the carriers to deliver and the clerks to box. Once the boxes were filled, Errol said she would take a lunch and return to work the window until her shift was up. She said she still wakes up early — usually between 5-6 a.m., which Errol doesn’t mind because she “likes to watch the world wake up.”

While Errol worked at the post office, it was not unusual to work up to 12 hours a day as well as 8 hours Saturday and a few hours on Sunday.

During the 1980s oil boom, the population of Weatherford grew immensely. Errol said the mail was never completely sorted through the day, and the sorters had to determine which mail would have to take precedence. After everything settled, all the mail got sorted and work hours shrunk to 4-8 hours.

Errol also was required to carry mail out to customer’s homes or businesses at times if the office was short on carriers.

“I remember when the city received a snow almost knee deep,” Errol said. “Every able-bodied employee helped deliver the mail. I took my own vehicle — a Ford Bronco — to the street to carry the required amount of mail I needed to deliver. Every time I would start out with the heavy pouch on my shoulder, I would think, “This has to be the last loop. I am just getting too tired.”’

However, Errol would return to her vehicle with an empty bag, refill it and begin another loop until all the mail was delivered. One of her final deliveries was to a couple of elderly ladies who had a mail receptacle too small for their mail.

“I knocked on their door, and when one of them answered, the most wonderful smell greeted me,” Errol said. “I mentioned how delicious the smell was, and she told me they had been baking bread all day. She fetched a loaf and said, ‘Here, take one with you.’ It was like a reward for sticking out the day.”

Errol continued to work for the Weatherford Post Office until she retired in 2012. She said she misses her customers very much.

“When I go about town and see one of them, we always have a nice visit,” she said. “There are several who, when I see them, I know we will have a great laugh while we are visiting — and I am never disappointed.”

Kim also retired about the same time. Since the couple had begun to raise cattle on a part-time basis years before, they decided to keep themselves busy with the business.

“Boy, were we busy and still are,” Errol said.

She said they both love working with cattle, especially watching the calves frolicking about. However, the cattle business is not an easy one. Errol said they never know what they will find when they feed and check on the cattle or what the cattle will sell for.

Errol said Kim decided the family needed to begin trout fishing during the early months of the year.

“We have great luck with that, often catching our limit when we go, which was often 1-2 days a week,” Errol said. “Sometimes, we will meet our son and granddaughter, rent a cabin and make weekend of it.”

Errol said she once caught a rare fish for dinner.

“I was reeling in a fish and it flashed gold,” she said. “It turned out to be a golden rainbow trout, which aren’t very plentiful. It was so beautiful I wanted to release it. However, the trout die during the summer months due to the temperature being too warm for them to live, so I took it home and had it for dinner.”

Errol said she still loves getting out and seeing her friends in Weatherford.

“I have a very special friend in my neighbor Carol,” Errol said. “She will come to my house, and we will sit on the front porch and visit — sometimes about serious situations, sometimes just to have some laughs.”

One particular laugh was caused by a snake which slithered in front of the pair during one of their porch sessions.

“Imagine the excitement we had as we took some pictures to send to our children,” Errol said. “I laughed as I told Carol I was sending it to my younger son. It would make his hair stand on end. When we asked him about it later, he said it did make his hand stand up and his wife thought it was hilarious.”

While reflecting on her life, Errol said she enjoys being retired but would not trade any experiences or memories for anything.