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The 25 Biggest Summer Health Hazards and How to Avoid Them

The 25 Biggest Summer Health Hazards and How to Avoid Them



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Bears might be the ‘biggest’ health hazard, but sun stroke is the deadliest

Summer motivates us to go on an adventure, but this inevitably raises our risk of sunburn, jellyfish sting, or boating accident.

The summer season conjures up memories of grilling, stupendous lobster rolls, cheap beer, swimming holes, and my personal favorite, being lulled to sleep by the soft clap of waves on the shore. But summer isn’t all fun in the sun.

The 25 Biggest Summer Health Hazards and How to Avoid Them Gallery

Summer motivates us to leave the house, hop in the car, and go on an adventure; this inevitably raises our risk of sunburn, jellyfish stings, or a boating accident. Summer is a time to get outside and enjoy the weather, but these health hazards can get in the way. Identifying the season’s great risk factors will allow you to properly prepare for anything summer will throw at you and still have a great time without placing yourself in peril.

These particular hazards vary in degrees of danger and risk. Despite the wide range of potential accidents, every activity becomes more dangerous when alcohol is involved, so restrict your drinking to the bar or backyard. Drinking in the sun is more dangerous than you think.

Some hazards are hard to avoid -- you’ll probably get sunburned, have a bout of athlete’s foot, or get bitten by an insect -- but the odds that you'll fall victim to a bear attack or drown are much lower. Still, it helps to be prepared for anything. Here are the 25 biggest summer health hazards and how to avoid them.

Holly Van Hare and Michael Serrur contributed to this story.


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Many accounts of ancient Egypt begin by stressing the influence of the environment, and particularly the great River Nile, on the everyday life of its people. It is a good place to start in considering the health of the Egyptians, as the Nile was the life- and health-giving source of water for drinking, cooking and washing. It also, however, harboured parasites and other creatures that were less beneficial.

Irrigation channels harbouring parasites, in a modern agricultural scene © As people waded through standing water, particularly in the agricultural irrigation channels, parasites such as the Schistosoma worm could enter the human host, via the feet or legs, to lay eggs in the bloodstream. These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs, making sufferers weak and susceptible to other diseases.

These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs.

Sometimes ancient Egyptians took in guinea worms in their drinking water. The female guinea worm would travel to its preferred site - the host's legs - in order to lay her eggs, again causing ill health.

Despite the fairly wide range of foodstuffs, cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and meat produced by the ancient Egyptians, not everybody would have had adequate nutrition. There is evidence from the bodies of ancient Egyptians, retrieved from their graves, that some people suffered nutritional deficiencies.

. some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries.

As in other societies, ancient Egyptians also suffered from more everyday types of sickness. Records reveal that some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries. Although it is difficult to gain information from mummies and skeletons about eye complaints, some artwork suggests that such problems were not uncommon. Flies, dirt and sand particles would have caused infections in the eyes and lungs. Many Egyptians wore eye paint, which may have been an attempt to ward off eye infections - it is now known that the green eye paint containing malachite had medicinal properties.


Page options

Many accounts of ancient Egypt begin by stressing the influence of the environment, and particularly the great River Nile, on the everyday life of its people. It is a good place to start in considering the health of the Egyptians, as the Nile was the life- and health-giving source of water for drinking, cooking and washing. It also, however, harboured parasites and other creatures that were less beneficial.

Irrigation channels harbouring parasites, in a modern agricultural scene © As people waded through standing water, particularly in the agricultural irrigation channels, parasites such as the Schistosoma worm could enter the human host, via the feet or legs, to lay eggs in the bloodstream. These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs, making sufferers weak and susceptible to other diseases.

These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs.

Sometimes ancient Egyptians took in guinea worms in their drinking water. The female guinea worm would travel to its preferred site - the host's legs - in order to lay her eggs, again causing ill health.

Despite the fairly wide range of foodstuffs, cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and meat produced by the ancient Egyptians, not everybody would have had adequate nutrition. There is evidence from the bodies of ancient Egyptians, retrieved from their graves, that some people suffered nutritional deficiencies.

. some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries.

As in other societies, ancient Egyptians also suffered from more everyday types of sickness. Records reveal that some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries. Although it is difficult to gain information from mummies and skeletons about eye complaints, some artwork suggests that such problems were not uncommon. Flies, dirt and sand particles would have caused infections in the eyes and lungs. Many Egyptians wore eye paint, which may have been an attempt to ward off eye infections - it is now known that the green eye paint containing malachite had medicinal properties.


Page options

Many accounts of ancient Egypt begin by stressing the influence of the environment, and particularly the great River Nile, on the everyday life of its people. It is a good place to start in considering the health of the Egyptians, as the Nile was the life- and health-giving source of water for drinking, cooking and washing. It also, however, harboured parasites and other creatures that were less beneficial.

Irrigation channels harbouring parasites, in a modern agricultural scene © As people waded through standing water, particularly in the agricultural irrigation channels, parasites such as the Schistosoma worm could enter the human host, via the feet or legs, to lay eggs in the bloodstream. These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs, making sufferers weak and susceptible to other diseases.

These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs.

Sometimes ancient Egyptians took in guinea worms in their drinking water. The female guinea worm would travel to its preferred site - the host's legs - in order to lay her eggs, again causing ill health.

Despite the fairly wide range of foodstuffs, cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and meat produced by the ancient Egyptians, not everybody would have had adequate nutrition. There is evidence from the bodies of ancient Egyptians, retrieved from their graves, that some people suffered nutritional deficiencies.

. some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries.

As in other societies, ancient Egyptians also suffered from more everyday types of sickness. Records reveal that some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries. Although it is difficult to gain information from mummies and skeletons about eye complaints, some artwork suggests that such problems were not uncommon. Flies, dirt and sand particles would have caused infections in the eyes and lungs. Many Egyptians wore eye paint, which may have been an attempt to ward off eye infections - it is now known that the green eye paint containing malachite had medicinal properties.


Page options

Many accounts of ancient Egypt begin by stressing the influence of the environment, and particularly the great River Nile, on the everyday life of its people. It is a good place to start in considering the health of the Egyptians, as the Nile was the life- and health-giving source of water for drinking, cooking and washing. It also, however, harboured parasites and other creatures that were less beneficial.

Irrigation channels harbouring parasites, in a modern agricultural scene © As people waded through standing water, particularly in the agricultural irrigation channels, parasites such as the Schistosoma worm could enter the human host, via the feet or legs, to lay eggs in the bloodstream. These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs, making sufferers weak and susceptible to other diseases.

These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs.

Sometimes ancient Egyptians took in guinea worms in their drinking water. The female guinea worm would travel to its preferred site - the host's legs - in order to lay her eggs, again causing ill health.

Despite the fairly wide range of foodstuffs, cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and meat produced by the ancient Egyptians, not everybody would have had adequate nutrition. There is evidence from the bodies of ancient Egyptians, retrieved from their graves, that some people suffered nutritional deficiencies.

. some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries.

As in other societies, ancient Egyptians also suffered from more everyday types of sickness. Records reveal that some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries. Although it is difficult to gain information from mummies and skeletons about eye complaints, some artwork suggests that such problems were not uncommon. Flies, dirt and sand particles would have caused infections in the eyes and lungs. Many Egyptians wore eye paint, which may have been an attempt to ward off eye infections - it is now known that the green eye paint containing malachite had medicinal properties.


Page options

Many accounts of ancient Egypt begin by stressing the influence of the environment, and particularly the great River Nile, on the everyday life of its people. It is a good place to start in considering the health of the Egyptians, as the Nile was the life- and health-giving source of water for drinking, cooking and washing. It also, however, harboured parasites and other creatures that were less beneficial.

Irrigation channels harbouring parasites, in a modern agricultural scene © As people waded through standing water, particularly in the agricultural irrigation channels, parasites such as the Schistosoma worm could enter the human host, via the feet or legs, to lay eggs in the bloodstream. These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs, making sufferers weak and susceptible to other diseases.

These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs.

Sometimes ancient Egyptians took in guinea worms in their drinking water. The female guinea worm would travel to its preferred site - the host's legs - in order to lay her eggs, again causing ill health.

Despite the fairly wide range of foodstuffs, cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and meat produced by the ancient Egyptians, not everybody would have had adequate nutrition. There is evidence from the bodies of ancient Egyptians, retrieved from their graves, that some people suffered nutritional deficiencies.

. some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries.

As in other societies, ancient Egyptians also suffered from more everyday types of sickness. Records reveal that some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries. Although it is difficult to gain information from mummies and skeletons about eye complaints, some artwork suggests that such problems were not uncommon. Flies, dirt and sand particles would have caused infections in the eyes and lungs. Many Egyptians wore eye paint, which may have been an attempt to ward off eye infections - it is now known that the green eye paint containing malachite had medicinal properties.


Page options

Many accounts of ancient Egypt begin by stressing the influence of the environment, and particularly the great River Nile, on the everyday life of its people. It is a good place to start in considering the health of the Egyptians, as the Nile was the life- and health-giving source of water for drinking, cooking and washing. It also, however, harboured parasites and other creatures that were less beneficial.

Irrigation channels harbouring parasites, in a modern agricultural scene © As people waded through standing water, particularly in the agricultural irrigation channels, parasites such as the Schistosoma worm could enter the human host, via the feet or legs, to lay eggs in the bloodstream. These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs, making sufferers weak and susceptible to other diseases.

These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs.

Sometimes ancient Egyptians took in guinea worms in their drinking water. The female guinea worm would travel to its preferred site - the host's legs - in order to lay her eggs, again causing ill health.

Despite the fairly wide range of foodstuffs, cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and meat produced by the ancient Egyptians, not everybody would have had adequate nutrition. There is evidence from the bodies of ancient Egyptians, retrieved from their graves, that some people suffered nutritional deficiencies.

. some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries.

As in other societies, ancient Egyptians also suffered from more everyday types of sickness. Records reveal that some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries. Although it is difficult to gain information from mummies and skeletons about eye complaints, some artwork suggests that such problems were not uncommon. Flies, dirt and sand particles would have caused infections in the eyes and lungs. Many Egyptians wore eye paint, which may have been an attempt to ward off eye infections - it is now known that the green eye paint containing malachite had medicinal properties.


Page options

Many accounts of ancient Egypt begin by stressing the influence of the environment, and particularly the great River Nile, on the everyday life of its people. It is a good place to start in considering the health of the Egyptians, as the Nile was the life- and health-giving source of water for drinking, cooking and washing. It also, however, harboured parasites and other creatures that were less beneficial.

Irrigation channels harbouring parasites, in a modern agricultural scene © As people waded through standing water, particularly in the agricultural irrigation channels, parasites such as the Schistosoma worm could enter the human host, via the feet or legs, to lay eggs in the bloodstream. These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs, making sufferers weak and susceptible to other diseases.

These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs.

Sometimes ancient Egyptians took in guinea worms in their drinking water. The female guinea worm would travel to its preferred site - the host's legs - in order to lay her eggs, again causing ill health.

Despite the fairly wide range of foodstuffs, cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and meat produced by the ancient Egyptians, not everybody would have had adequate nutrition. There is evidence from the bodies of ancient Egyptians, retrieved from their graves, that some people suffered nutritional deficiencies.

. some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries.

As in other societies, ancient Egyptians also suffered from more everyday types of sickness. Records reveal that some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries. Although it is difficult to gain information from mummies and skeletons about eye complaints, some artwork suggests that such problems were not uncommon. Flies, dirt and sand particles would have caused infections in the eyes and lungs. Many Egyptians wore eye paint, which may have been an attempt to ward off eye infections - it is now known that the green eye paint containing malachite had medicinal properties.


Page options

Many accounts of ancient Egypt begin by stressing the influence of the environment, and particularly the great River Nile, on the everyday life of its people. It is a good place to start in considering the health of the Egyptians, as the Nile was the life- and health-giving source of water for drinking, cooking and washing. It also, however, harboured parasites and other creatures that were less beneficial.

Irrigation channels harbouring parasites, in a modern agricultural scene © As people waded through standing water, particularly in the agricultural irrigation channels, parasites such as the Schistosoma worm could enter the human host, via the feet or legs, to lay eggs in the bloodstream. These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs, making sufferers weak and susceptible to other diseases.

These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs.

Sometimes ancient Egyptians took in guinea worms in their drinking water. The female guinea worm would travel to its preferred site - the host's legs - in order to lay her eggs, again causing ill health.

Despite the fairly wide range of foodstuffs, cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and meat produced by the ancient Egyptians, not everybody would have had adequate nutrition. There is evidence from the bodies of ancient Egyptians, retrieved from their graves, that some people suffered nutritional deficiencies.

. some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries.

As in other societies, ancient Egyptians also suffered from more everyday types of sickness. Records reveal that some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries. Although it is difficult to gain information from mummies and skeletons about eye complaints, some artwork suggests that such problems were not uncommon. Flies, dirt and sand particles would have caused infections in the eyes and lungs. Many Egyptians wore eye paint, which may have been an attempt to ward off eye infections - it is now known that the green eye paint containing malachite had medicinal properties.


Page options

Many accounts of ancient Egypt begin by stressing the influence of the environment, and particularly the great River Nile, on the everyday life of its people. It is a good place to start in considering the health of the Egyptians, as the Nile was the life- and health-giving source of water for drinking, cooking and washing. It also, however, harboured parasites and other creatures that were less beneficial.

Irrigation channels harbouring parasites, in a modern agricultural scene © As people waded through standing water, particularly in the agricultural irrigation channels, parasites such as the Schistosoma worm could enter the human host, via the feet or legs, to lay eggs in the bloodstream. These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs, making sufferers weak and susceptible to other diseases.

These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs.

Sometimes ancient Egyptians took in guinea worms in their drinking water. The female guinea worm would travel to its preferred site - the host's legs - in order to lay her eggs, again causing ill health.

Despite the fairly wide range of foodstuffs, cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and meat produced by the ancient Egyptians, not everybody would have had adequate nutrition. There is evidence from the bodies of ancient Egyptians, retrieved from their graves, that some people suffered nutritional deficiencies.

. some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries.

As in other societies, ancient Egyptians also suffered from more everyday types of sickness. Records reveal that some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries. Although it is difficult to gain information from mummies and skeletons about eye complaints, some artwork suggests that such problems were not uncommon. Flies, dirt and sand particles would have caused infections in the eyes and lungs. Many Egyptians wore eye paint, which may have been an attempt to ward off eye infections - it is now known that the green eye paint containing malachite had medicinal properties.


Page options

Many accounts of ancient Egypt begin by stressing the influence of the environment, and particularly the great River Nile, on the everyday life of its people. It is a good place to start in considering the health of the Egyptians, as the Nile was the life- and health-giving source of water for drinking, cooking and washing. It also, however, harboured parasites and other creatures that were less beneficial.

Irrigation channels harbouring parasites, in a modern agricultural scene © As people waded through standing water, particularly in the agricultural irrigation channels, parasites such as the Schistosoma worm could enter the human host, via the feet or legs, to lay eggs in the bloodstream. These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs, making sufferers weak and susceptible to other diseases.

These worms caused a lot of damage as they travelled through various internal organs.

Sometimes ancient Egyptians took in guinea worms in their drinking water. The female guinea worm would travel to its preferred site - the host's legs - in order to lay her eggs, again causing ill health.

Despite the fairly wide range of foodstuffs, cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and meat produced by the ancient Egyptians, not everybody would have had adequate nutrition. There is evidence from the bodies of ancient Egyptians, retrieved from their graves, that some people suffered nutritional deficiencies.

. some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries.

As in other societies, ancient Egyptians also suffered from more everyday types of sickness. Records reveal that some tomb builders complained of headaches, others were too drunk to go to work, and some had emotional worries. Although it is difficult to gain information from mummies and skeletons about eye complaints, some artwork suggests that such problems were not uncommon. Flies, dirt and sand particles would have caused infections in the eyes and lungs. Many Egyptians wore eye paint, which may have been an attempt to ward off eye infections - it is now known that the green eye paint containing malachite had medicinal properties.


Watch the video: Andy Haldane in conversation (August 2022).